• Wed
  • Jul 30, 2014
  • Updated: 4:23pm

Let the people choose

PUBLISHED : Friday, 03 August, 2012, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 15 August, 2012, 10:58pm

1 Tai chi

This is a traditional Chinese sport, and one of the Chinese martial arts. Strengthening bones, accelerating blood circulation, boosting the immune system and increasing lung capacity are a few of its benefits. The sport is suitable for hectic city dwellers who would like to live a healthier life. If tai chi were added to the Olympics, it could help promote good living to the rest of the world. Natalie Fung

2 Sepak takraw

If I could add something to the Olympics, I would choose a Malaysian sport called sepak takraw. It is similar to volleyball, except it is faster-paced and requires more skills. The differences are that the ball is only slightly bigger than a baseball, and you can only use your feet, knees, chest and head. There are awesome spin-kicks and flips in the game. Pradyumn Dayal

3 Competitive napping

After a long, difficult day at school, there's no better activity than napping. Let's see who can nap the longest at their desks. Other categories could include creative napping, for example, using a dictionary as a pillow, and speed napping, testing who can fall asleep in the shortest time. Candace Kwan

4 Lacrosse

This is North America's oldest sport and dates back to the 15th century. The native Americans played it as a sort of spiritual game that tested players' agility, strength and skill. It was once an Olympic sport, but was removed. I would bring lacrosse back because it shows how sports have evolved over the years. Talise Tsai

5 Roller skating

I would add roller skating to the Olympic programme because it's very popular among young people and super-easy to learn. It would definitely arouse teenagers' interest in the Games. John Cheng

6 Cheerleading

Usually involving a lot of people-tossing and somersaulting, cheerleading is an incredibly intensive sport. Since the Olympics are a combination of physical and mental skills, why not add cheerleading to the list? Doris Lam

7 Speed writing

Writing is a survival skill, especially for Hong Kong students who need to write like they have motorised hands, to achieve good exam results. If speed writing were a sport, I could totally see three Hong Kong students standing on the Olympic podium. Kate Ng

8 Speed texting

The emergence of whatsapp has taken texting to a whole new level. Texting is no longer just a way to communicate, but a widely practised sport. Wouldn't it be fun to watch athletes' delicate fingers dance across their phones and compete against each other to find out who's the quickest typist? Giselle Chan

9 Freestyle skipping

Freestyle skipping is an extreme version of rope skipping. It requires a lot of teamwork, with two people twirling two ropes and other rope skippers improvising stylish routines in the rope-twirling setting. Though challenging, freestyle skipping is a sport which focuses on creativity, along with some elements of gymnastics. It certainly deserves a place in the next Olympics. Annie Tam

10 Bowling

All over the world, millions of people enjoy this sport. Not only is it popular for recreation, but it also improves your physical and mental toughness. Bowling is a sport that requires good skills, concentration and perseverance in addition to physical fitness. Like many other sports, it can be played individually or in teams. It's a mystery why bowling is still missing from the Olympic Games. Wong Oi-man

Next week:

Many of us can't wait for summer to come, but when it's literally here, we get bored and are itching for some action. For next week's top 10, tell us the craziest thing you've ever done in summer, or think of one 'crazy' activity that you dare to do. Send your answer, together with your name, to junior.reporters.club@scmp.com with 'top 10 activity' in the subject line.

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