• Wed
  • Apr 16, 2014
  • Updated: 10:41pm

Officials feared failure of back-up data system

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 25 November, 1998, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 25 November, 1998, 12:00am

The back-up flight data system was not used on airport opening day because it may have also failed, it was revealed yesterday.


The Airport Authority admitted the reserve system may have caused a second wave of problems if it stalled like the main flight information display system at Chek Lap Kok on July 6.


The Commission of Inquiry on the New Airport heard such a scenario could have worsened the opening which was already thrown into chaos when the main system came to a near standstill.


Airport management director Chern Heed told the commission it was better to re-boot the ailing main system rather than risk a more 'severe' situation by switching over to the standby.


He said it was better to 'persist' with solving faults with the main system and get it back up to speed.


'The main problem was the slowness and the best way out was to re-boot it. We felt if we were going to work out this problem, we should persist and see it through so we could eradicate it,' Mr Heed said.


'As long as the main system did not crash we could stick with it and work out the problems. If we went to the standby system we would have then been committed to it for the rest of the day - it would not have been a good scenario at the time.' He said if the main system could not be revived over three hours then the standby network would have been used.


The airport was thrown into chaos on the morning of opening day due to corrupt flight information on monitors which confused passengers, ground crews and airline staff.


The commission heard the authority finally regained 'full control' on day six.


The inquiry before Mr Justice Woo Kwok-hing continues tomorrow.


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