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  • Jul 24, 2014
  • Updated: 9:41am

Hong Kong Sevens

The Cathay Pacific/HSBC Hong Kong Sevens is an international seven-a-side rugby tournament held every March as part of the Sevens World Series and featuring the world’s top teams.

Bachelor Campese enjoys his own company - and cooking

PUBLISHED : Friday, 29 January, 1999, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 29 January, 1999, 12:00am

Rugby legend David Campese says that when he's not flying around the world, he loves getting down to do some home cooking.


'The last meal I cooked was for 10 to 15 guests in my home and I just loved it.' His favourite dish is pasta, 'don't forget I'm of Italian origin'.


And eating healthily is all part and parcel of the qualities which earned him the reputation of being the world's finest rugby winger.


His diet includes stacks of vegetables, carbohydrates and protein like chicken and fish.


'Learning how to cook has come in handy too, especially if you are a bachelor like me.' He admits to being a loner and enjoys his own company. His leisure activities - golf, driving, reading and listening to music - do not require the presence of a significant other.


'I always believed that if you want to achieve something, you've got to sacrifice. Being 37 and still single has its good and bad sides.' A hectic schedule - 'I was back home for only six days the whole of last month' - means it can be difficult to develop a relationship.


In town for the official draw for the 1999 Credit Suisse First Boston Hong Kong Sevens to be held on the weekend of March 26-28, he remains undecided on whether he will play.


However, he will captain the Australian team but selects other sides as favourites for the title.


'New Zealand, Fiji, Samoa, France and Argentina . . . Australia's young players lack experience.' If he decides not to play, he'll be working as a commentator on TV. 'I've done it for Channel 10 and 7 on Australian TV and Fox Network and I enjoy it.' David also own a sports management company which represents young athletes as well as two shops which market his own line of rugby gear plus a coffee shop.


'I went to a coffee school to study all about coffee and how to make a perfect cup.' Comfortably off today, he recalls the early years when he used to earn A$20 (HK$95) a day playing rugby, before the big money came into the game and he had to supplement his income by working in a sawmill and a zoo.


Is he content staying a bachelor forever? 'I do plan to eventually settle down and have kids but its hard finding the right person. The older you get, the more cynical you become.'

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