Newspaper chairman 'ruled like an emperor' | South China Morning Post
  • Fri
  • Jan 30, 2015
  • Updated: 10:38am

Newspaper chairman 'ruled like an emperor'

PUBLISHED : Friday, 09 March, 2001, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 09 March, 2001, 12:00am
 

The former chairman of the Oriental Press Group, Ma Ching-kwan, had been described as ruling the company like an emperor presiding over his feudal kingdom, a court heard yesterday.


Karl Wilson, who was foreign editor at the Eastern Express after its 1994 launch, told the Court of First Instance that a senior reporter had told him of seeing Mr Ma coming on to the editorial floor and seeing a Cultural Revolution poster. 'He [Mr Ma] said: 'There is only one chairman in this building and it is me',' the court heard.


Mr Wilson said the difference in working for a newspaper with a Chinese management style and an English-language one was like 'night and day'.


He said he was told by the reporter that Mr Ma 'rules it [OPG] like a feudal kingdom. He is the emperor'.


Mr Wilson was testifying in a civil case OPG launched after it claimed an article in Next Magazine libelled the group by accusing it of interfering with the editorial independence of Hong Kong's now-defunct third English-language newspaper. The article, published on September 16, 1994, detailed circumstances surrounding the dismissal of founding editor Stephen Vines.


The magazine, its editor-in-chief, Cheung Kim-hung, and printer Toppan Printing Co (HK) Ltd, are facing the libel suit. OPG claims Mr Vines was sacked for being a 'very bad administrator'.


Mr Wilson told Mr Justice David Yam Yee-kwan that Mr Vines was a fine administrator. He said Mr Vines wanted to set up an 'independent, free-thinking' newspaper - an idea which was echoed by Mr Ma.


He said Mr Ma also had another goal - to surpass the South China Morning Post within six months.


But Mr Wilson said that shortly after the paper started up, jealousy among the staff within the group led to a sabotage campaign aimed at harming the paper's success. 'Within certain quarters they did not want to see that paper succeed, it was the impression we got.'


The case continues.


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