The internet: a blessing to mankind

PUBLISHED : Thursday, 21 April, 2005, 12:00am
UPDATED : Thursday, 21 April, 2005, 12:00am
 

The internet is probably the greatest invention in the history of civilisation.


What I love most about the internet is that you can find aything you want, from plans for cannons to information on growing avocados, in-depth rules to Australian Rules football and more.


The strangest thing I discovered was that there are many Oliver Kwans. They are either chief executives of companies on the mainland or doctors.


I have to admit that I am addicted to the internet.


The other day, the cable connection at my home was broken and I displayed all classical symptoms of withdrawal.


I was thankful that the connection was resumed just when I started frothing at the mouth, because I was in danger of blacking out if I still couldn't read my e-mail.


I see the internet as a pipeline of everything I could ever ask for, flowing directly into my home.


If you could bottle and sell what makes the internet so addictive, you'd be a billionaire.


It's worth mentioning that I'm checking my e-mail and listening to internet radio as I'm writing this.


The internet has also become my main source of information.


The one time I was forced to do research in the library, I used its high-speed internet terminal to dig up what I was looking for.


My teachers have been telling me about how books are better, but I disagree.


A book is essentially a hard copy of the internet.


The main difference is that the internet is updated more often, and it's a lot easier and quicker to check your e-mail and find information for a school project on the internet.


If I knew who came up with the idea of the internet, I would find them and give them a big, big hug.


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