• Thu
  • Jul 24, 2014
  • Updated: 5:50pm

Wide horizon for yacht broker

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 10 June, 2006, 12:00am
UPDATED : Saturday, 10 June, 2006, 12:00am

YACHT BROKING CAN be a very attractive job: you spend much of the time selling and buying yachts and talking to clients and the rest of your working hours out at sea.


Yacht brokers get to spend many working hours at sea delivering clients' boats to other parts of the region or sailing yachts to the marina.


Many people see yacht broking as an ideal combination of job and hobby.


'Traditionally, the sailing industry has employed mainly people who have a love for boating and who have a lot of first-hand experience, such as a former boat skipper of a private motor-yacht who has decided to come ashore and settle down,' said Bill Hutchison, group general manager of Simpson Marine.


'As a skipper or experienced yachtsman, you get to know how boats work and how to fix them. You also have to build contacts and friends who can be important assets in your life as a broker,' he said.


However, the industry is evolving and becoming more professionally oriented, and certain skills and qualifications are becoming essential.


'Employers like us look for an interest in boats from job applicants, but increasingly we also look at things such as proven sales experience,' Mr Hutchison said.


'Selling is a skill in its own right. A salesman from a high-end motor dealership like Ferrari or Porsche might have a greater empathy with our customers.'


Yacht broking is a competitive market.


'We seldom have to advertise. We are constantly being approached by people who would like to get into the industry. They include people with captain's certificates, sales and marketing degrees and boat- and yacht-building certificates.


'A mix of boating experience and sales skills is ideal,' he said.


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