• Tue
  • Jul 22, 2014
  • Updated: 7:48pm

Public Eye

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 17 June, 2009, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 17 June, 2009, 12:00am

Politically harmonious? There's no such thing

Did you see that rather odd newspaper advertisement by a new movement calling itself Hong Kong Restart? It contains the usual cliches about loving Hong Kong and China, social harmony, self-reliance and homegrown rather than western-style democracy. Well, you can restart all you want. It's just not going to happen. There's no such thing as a politically harmonious democracy, western-style or not. And who decides what's the correct way to love Hong Kong anyway? So let's focus on the doable. Public Eye suggests instead of restarting we reboot to rid Hong Kong of things such as toilet paper rip-offs in fake supermarket sales, business sector greed, heartless Mui Wo residents who ridicule young recovering drug abusers, construction noise and, of course, barking dogs. They have no place in a harmonious society.

Bureaucrats can't see past 'choonami'

How long did we have to wait for a levy on plastic bags? Ten years maybe. Finally, it's about to happen. And idling engines that foul the air we breathe? How long have we waited for a ban on that? We're still waiting. So you can just forget about any quick government fix for light pollution. Those blinding neon lights that blanket our stars will still be polluting the night sky well after you're gone. If you want to see stars anytime soon, go to a planetarium. Or smack yourself hard in the head. You'll see plenty before you pass out. But forget about actual star-gazing. That's because the iron rice bowl bureaucrats who staff the so-called Environmental Protection Department want to 'study' the need for controlling light pollution. Study the need? Haven't they already been doing that for some time? And haven't independent studies already shown that energy-wasting light pollution is out of control here? But no, our bureaucrats still want to study some more, at least until the end of the year. Time is not of the essence to them. They have iron rice bowls. They can take all the time in the world, like they did with plastic bags and idling engines. They can do studies, more studies, study the findings, consult the public, study the results, then put off a decision so they can focus on solving the financial 'tsunami' as our bureaucrats love to call the crisis. Public Eye wishes they would at least say it right instead of always pronouncing it 'choonami'.

Who is Coco giving the finger to?

Who is fashion legend Coco Chanel giving the finger to? The people who pulled the cigarette right out of her hand maybe? Public Eye is aghast at the tantrum over a poster of the movie Coco Before Chanel showing Hollywood star Audrey Tautou holding a cigarette. To all those who kicked up a fuss, claiming the poster promotes smoking, Public Eye has this to say: get a life. Coco Chanel was a heavy smoker, for goodness sake. She puffed two packs a day. Most pictures of her show a cigarette between her fingers. The movie poster of Tautou playing the fashion icon with a cigarette in her hand tells the truth. Now the truth has been digitally erased in revised posters. We're left with an unsmiling Tautou with hand in mid-air as if she can't decide what finger to use to give all of us the finger.

One person's terrorist is another's nutcase

Who qualifies to be called a terrorist? It depends. If you throw acid from a rooftop onto a busy Mong Kok street, you're just an acid attacker. But if you throw it onto a crowded New York street, the American media will instantly label you a terrorist. If you turn out to be a Muslim, the label will stick. If not, you'll be relabelled a nutcase. James von Brunn, who burst into Washington's Holocaust Museum with a gun blazing, killing a security guard, was labelled a white supremacist. What if he had been an Arab? Would the media have labelled him a Muslim supremacist or a terrorist? You know the answer to that.

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