• Wed
  • Nov 26, 2014
  • Updated: 12:05pm

Cheung Kong Holdings

Hutchison Whampoa, one of Hong Kong’s largest listed companies, is controlled by  Cheung Kong Group, a property company. Hutchison's operations span ports, property and hotels, retailing, power generation and telecommunications. It owns Cheung Kong Infrastructure, and  is headed by Li Ka-shing, Asia’s wealthiest man. 

One rule for us, no rule for them

PUBLISHED : Sunday, 12 December, 2010, 12:00am
UPDATED : Sunday, 12 December, 2010, 12:00am
 

What a rotten world we live in! Before WikiLeaks has even been charged with a crime it's been removed from the internet, had its funds frozen and had media figures and politicians call for the assassination of its leader, Julian Assange, and for it to be labelled a terrorist organisation. Both Assange and Bradley Manning, the soldier who leaked the United States diplomatic cables now being released in batches, are in custody - the former to answer hard-to-define accusations that are being manipulated to, it must be assumed, deliver him into the clutches of the US 'justice' system, which has already shown itself to be untrustworthy when it comes to foreigners labelled terrorists. Manning is facing up to 52 years in jail.

Meanwhile, the two architects of the second Gulf war, George Bush and Tony Blair, who used a lie to launch an invasion that's claimed about 655,000 lives (according to a study by medical journal The Lancet) have been left at liberty to conduct book tours and enjoy especially cushy lives.

Closer to home, it looks as though our government will get away with gifting HK$1.5 billion to developer Cheung Kong (Holdings) in an incredible measuring error while elsewhere in the country parents are being locked up for asking why their children were buried under poorly constructed school buildings or poisoned by adulterated milk.

The pattern? The victims of the huge crimes - in these cases, Iraqis and Hong Kong taxpayers - are of no consequence to the powers-that-be while the actions (can they really be called 'crimes'?) of the likes of WikiLeaks and mainland petitioners offend those powers.

Very, very rotten indeed.

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