Top marks in poll for Chinese U's Joseph Sung

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 26 July, 2011, 12:00am
UPDATED : Tuesday, 26 July, 2011, 12:00am
 

He has been in the job for only a year but Chinese University vice-chancellor, Professor Joseph Sung Jao-yiu, tops the rankings as the most popular head of the city's universities.

Sung, who was appointed in November 2009 and took over from economist Lawrence Lau Juen-yee on July 1 last year, edged out the poll's 2010 winner, Hong Kong University's Professor Tsui Lap-chee.

He scored 7.84 out of 10, according to a survey by the Education18.com website and the University of Hong Kong's Public Opinion Programme.

Lam Tak- ming, an editor for Education18.com, said Sung's 'high rating can be explained by the limelight he has been exposed to [over the years], given his involvement in the Sars crisis and exposure to the media through his publications'.

'Compared to Tsui Lap-chee, he definitely has more public exposure,' Lam said.

Sung was dubbed one of the 'Sars heroes' for his frontline work in treating patients at Prince of Wales Hospital at the peak of the outbreak in 2003.

The poll interviewed 1,201 people aged above 18 by phone between May and last month.

The public perception was no different from that of secondary school principals in a separate survey to rank the city's universities and their heads. The principals gave Sung a score of 8.29, the highest since the survey was introduced in 2007.

Meanwhile, the University of Hong Kong topped another poll as the best university, followed by Chinese University and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

The rankings took into account marks for admission grades, research performance, performance of graduates, research output, lecturer-student ratios and library collections.

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