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  • Jul 13, 2014
  • Updated: 4:10am

Public Eye

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 16 November, 2011, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 16 November, 2011, 12:00am

Is Fan's farce really over?

Has she really flip-flopped for the final time? Rita Fan Hsu Lai-tai declared on Sunday that she won't run for chief executive. But you never know with flip-flop Fan. One minute she says she's interested in the job, the next she says maybe not. Then she says she lacks administrative skills but will learn. She confesses that she sucks in financial matters too but will cram. She says she won't run if Henry Tang Ying-yen runs, then she says she may even if he does. Fan's farce, played out over six months, totally flummoxed the people. She blamed Sunday's final flip-flop on her age. It took her six months to realise she's already 66? If she can't even figure out her own age then surely she's missing more than just administrative and financial skills. No, it's not age, it's the people. Fan's many flip-flops pushed her poll numbers into a free fall. The people simply got fed up with her clownish games. Let's hope it's the last we hear of flip-flop Fan.

Don't expect any knockout blows

Just four months to selection day but the presumed candidates are still only throwing marshmallows. Where are the real jabs, the bloodied nose and the puffed-up eyes? Public Eye doesn't expect either Tang or Leung Chun-ying to land a knockout punch, but come on, fellas, at least go after each other. Look at the Republican candidates fighting to be US president. Ridicule rocked Rick Perry, who couldn't remember the name of a government agency he would shut down as president, while sex scandals hound Herman Cain, who blinked a brainless blink when asked about Libya. The candidates tussled over how best to torture terrorists. Okay, so Hongkongers are not into torture, but what do we really know about Tang and Leung? The people have no vote. A 1,200-member selection committee will chose the next chief executive. But whoever wins will need an informal mandate from the people to govern effectively. So fellas, tell the people how you differ from each other. Come out swinging.

Public pariahs have no mandate

The banana-throwers threw bananas in the name of the people. They progressed from bananas to all manner of missiles. They wagged fingers, hurled insults and talked like thugs to top officials in the Legislative Council. All in the name of the people. But the people punished them at the district council polls. Legislators 'Long Hair' Leung Kwok-hung, Wong Yuk-man and Albert Chan Wai-yip have become public pariahs. Their two parties fielded over 100 candidates. One won. But the three say their thuggish Legco behaviour will go on. Fine, but in whose name? Certainly not in the name of the people.

Shame on the prophets of doom

Public Eye asks again: where have all the prophets of doom gone? They fanned fears of an economic apocalypse if Hong Kong introduced a minimum wage of a measly HK$28 an hour. They warned of massive lay-offs. Now, six months after the minimum wage law came into effect, nothing. Bosses are hiring, nor firing. Our government owes the workers an apology. Officials turned a blind eye to slave wages and partnered with the prophets of doom to commit this moral crime. When outrage grew shriller the officials suggested a voluntary minimum wage, which the bosses ignored. Officials only moved on an actual law when public disgust reached bursting point. And when such a law became imminent, slave-wage bosses such as Cafe de Coral cancelled paid meal breaks. Only public ridicule forced a U-turn. Our officials should hang their heads in shame for making our poorest-paid workers suffer slave wages for so long. As for the prophets of doom, what have you got to say now? Lost your voices?

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