• Thu
  • Aug 21, 2014
  • Updated: 10:07am

Idea of conservation must grow at school

PUBLISHED : Monday, 30 April, 2012, 12:00am
UPDATED : Monday, 30 April, 2012, 12:00am

King George V School, in Ho Man Tin, conducted a Green Week by reducing a different resource on each day during the week.

The activity, organised at the end of last month by the school's green team, which is known as 10%, expanded on last year's one-day event. Students were encouraged not to use different resources, including printing, air conditioning, and laptop charging.

The green team hope the event will help students to value resources that are often taken for granted and adopt a green lifestyle.

The green team also tried to implement recycling in a fun way, such as asking students to make tree sculptures from recycled materials.

Since 2006, the team have been replacing most of the existing light bulbs in school corridors with energy-efficient ones. This has helped the school to save more than HK$1 million on its electricity bill over the past six years.

'We are always looking for innovative ways to get people involved, and we're interested in co-operating with other schools and organisations throughout Hong Kong,' William Zhang, one of the team's executive directors, says. 'In future, we plan to turn Green Week into an annual event, coinciding with Earth Hour, and include a beach clean-up.'

Yet some students are not as enthusiastic about the green group's activities as they were before. They believe the 10% team can do more to promote sustainability, such as holding monthly environmental activities.

The school spent HK$1.5million on its electricity last year, cutting its consumption by only 0.3 per cent. 'If the team are to make a real, positive difference to the environment, they should do a lot more,' says Alistair Yap, a Year 10 student.

Members of the green team are aware of the lack of enthusiasm among some students. 'We need the effort of the entire student body for the school to save electricity,' Zhang says. 'We are working hard to get students involved and are always open to new ideas.'

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