• Fri
  • Jul 25, 2014
  • Updated: 11:14pm
BusinessCommodities
ENERGY

Cost of importing power from China should be Hong Kong's first consideration, says CLP boss

PUBLISHED : Friday, 09 May, 2014, 1:14am
UPDATED : Friday, 09 May, 2014, 8:52am

"Tens of billions" of dollars in infrastructure will be needed to realise the government's plan to have 30 per cent of Hong Kong's power imported from the mainland by 2023, says CLP chief executive Richard Lancaster.

But the interests of industry and consumers were more important than the cost, he said after the annual shareholders' meeting of CLP, the larger of the city's two power suppliers.

"The infrastructure cost, when amortised over 40, 50 years, is relatively small. The more important and more expensive consideration is the cost of energy you are importing," he said, citing CLP's annual gas import bill of over HK$10 billion.

More important and expensive … is the cost of energy you are importing
RICHARD LANCASTER

The plan to import power from the mainland to meet environmental protection goals has fired debate in Hong Kong.

Those against the proposal say the city, as a major international financial centre with a heavy concentration of high-rise buildings, cannot afford the risk of relying on power supply from the mainland. Others believe supply risks are overstated and can be managed through proper infrastructure design.

Lancaster said CLP had maintained high supply reliability having imported 30 per cent of its power from Shenzhen's Daya Bay nuclear plant via dedicated power lines for decades.

China Southern Power Grid will soon become a major business partner of CLP, which supplies Kowloon, the New Territories and Lantau. The monopoly power distributor in five southern provinces is about to complete the acquisition of 30 per cent of CLP's main Hong Kong operating unit.

Unlike CLP, Hongkong Electric (HKE), which supplies Hong Kong Island and Lamma Island, has no power trade arrangement with China Southern Power.

HKE managing director Wan Chi-tin on Wednesday warned of energy security risks and a weakening of Hong Kong's bargaining power if the city imports 30 per cent of its power. Instead, he said he supported building more gas-fired power plants as gas prices had peaked three years ago.

CLP Power Hong Kong vice-chairwoman Betty Yuen So Siu-mai did not share his view, saying gas prices were hard to predict.

While CLP earlier warned it would need substantial increases in power prices in the next few years to cover higher gas costs, Yuen noted CLP's current power price was similar to levels in Guangzhou, Dongguan and Shenzhen.

CLP would like more flexibility in the options that have been tabled so far to ensure reliability, pollution-control and affordability objectives, she said.

Share

For unlimited access to:

SCMP.com SCMP Tablet Edition SCMP Mobile Edition 10-year news archive
 
 

 

3

This article is now closed to comments

How About
Unless CLP plans to buy up shareholdings of all viable Guangdong province power-providers, HKG should ensure there is another supplier which is not an affiliate or subsidiary of CLP.
.
Then there is the water supply.
.
dynamco
"Tens of billions" of dollars in infrastructure will be needed to realise the government's plan to have 30 per cent of Hong Kong's power imported from the mainland by 2023, says CLP chief executive Richard Lancaster.
Of course that means CLP will benefit under the Scheme of Control arrangement so they can up their returns.
CLP 2013 Report
Concluded the Interim Review under the Scheme of Control Agreement
• Received approval from the Govt for the 2014–2018 Development Plan
• Collaborated with China Southern Power Grid Co, Ltd (CSG) to each acquire
1/2 of ExxonMobil’s 60% interest in Castle Peak Power Company Limited (CAPCO);
CLP will also purchase ExxonMobil’s 51% stake in Hong Kong Pumped Storage
Development Company, Limited (PSDC)
• Completed the Hong Kong Branch Line project, a new gas receiving station and Black
Point Power Station modifications to receive gas supplies from PetroChina’s 2nd
West-East Gas Pipeline
'Sales to the Chinese mainland amounted to 1,650GWh, a 10.2% decrease from 2012, mainly due to lower committed sales to Guangdong Power Grid Corporation. Total electricity sales, including both local sales and sales to the Mainland,decreased by 1.2% to 33,433GWh'
SO, they import Mainland nuclear for beneficial fuel mix reasons & burn polluting Indonesian coal locally to generate power which they then export back to the Mainland
dunndavid
"...burn polluting Indonesian coal locally to generate power which they then export back to the Mainland" Most Indonesian coal for export is sub-bituminous and LOW polluting. Low sulfur and better than average for NOx control. Much like PRB coal in the U.S. Indonesian bituminous would be similar to bituminous from other countries. Here is the key though: coal in the hands of CLP is far less polluting than would be the case in China. CLP knows what they are doing and has performance similar to coal power plants in the West. China on the other hand doesn't know what it's doing and has emissions many times that of the west.
 
 
 
 
 

Login

SCMP.com Account

or