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  • Aug 21, 2014
  • Updated: 6:37pm
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PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 29 April, 2014, 6:06pm
UPDATED : Wednesday, 30 April, 2014, 9:18am

Protect Hong Kong tourism from the stigma of bad manners

Kelly Yang's mainland holiday convinced her of the need to keep tourism in HK civilised - and that means no peeing in public, for a start

When the story of a mainland toddler urinating in a Hong Kong street went viral online, I was on a flight back to the city from a holiday in Hainan.

My first reaction was relief; it was a pleasant reminder that I was heading home. In other parts of China, a toddler urinating in the street is nothing; here, it's front-page news.

I read with great interest the many facets of the story - the young mother wandering the busy streets of Mong Kok and her crying two-year-old shrieking that he might burst. All this culminated in his mother's decision to let him drop his trousers on the street.

As he peed, a Hong Kong crowd gathered, who alternatively filmed and gasped. It was like a scene in a movie. Except that it was reality, and it had been my reality, too, for my holiday on the mainland.

While I did not see any children pee in the street on my trip, I saw plenty of children - and adults - peeing in the pool

While I did not see any children pee in the street on my trip, I saw plenty of children - and adults - peeing in the pool. In fact, I felt them pee. I was sitting beside them in the pool and I felt a warm gush of liquid ripple my way.

One man, who had had too much to drink the night before, took it up a notch and threw up in the pool. Another used the pool as an ashtray, happily tossing his cigarettes in the water.

At breakfast the next day, a man carrying a plateful of food from the buffet came over and plopped himself down at our table. "Excuse me, sir, what are you doing?" I asked him. "I'm eating," he said, his mouth full of dried apricots.

"I know, but why are you eating here?"

"What do you mean?" he asked me. He looked genuinely confused. I pointed to a free table just next to us. "Look, there's a free table right there!"

He shook his head and turned his attention back to his plate. I thought about giving up. I was on vacation and didn't want to argue. But it was a very small table and not including this man in conversation seemed impossible. So I tried again.

"Excuse me, sir, but it would really mean a lot to me if you sat somewhere else," I said. "I mean, I'd move myself but we have five people and all this food. And you're just one person."

He glanced at the nearby table and then at me.

"But why? What's your problem? Why can't I sit here? Why can't we just sit together!"

"Because! We're not part of the same family! That's why!" I practically shrieked in Putonghua.

Sulking, he took his pyramid of food and with one last, lingering look at our table, got up and left.

Years of travelling to China have made me accept comical situations like this one. They've become a part of the China experience. You know when you book that flight to Beijing or Shanghai that you're going to see a spitting hawker or two.

Yet, a holiday in Hong Kong is not supposed to be filled with such inappropriate moments. We pride ourselves on our clean streets, orderly conduct, and ample rubbish bins, street lights and toilets.

And herein lies the real reason why we're so angry over the urinating toddler. We like tourism. We want to protect it. We don't want urinating toddlers to get woven into the fabric of Hong Kong tourism.

Kelly Yang is the founder of The Kelly Yang Project, an after-school programme for children in Hong Kong. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, and Harvard Law School. kelly@kellyyang.edu.hk

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This article is now closed to comments

whsmith
I totally agree with you.
536277e8-9dec-458d-8e18-34fe0a320969
From comments above,i'm more sure HK people are independent-minded and cool-headed.Last month when i sat on a chair in Star-light Avenue,en elderly beside asked me:ur first time to HK? I said no ,fr Shenzhen and often here.He said we welcome you and just ignore "oust ****",i said HK is a democratic society(except for fakely elected Chief Executive hah), it is natural to have different voices.Such lovely conversation.At last tell the elitist writer Yang:visit ur neighbour Shenzhen,u'll find a greener and cleaner city even compared with HK.
536277e8-9dec-458d-8e18-34fe0a320969
"****"means HK also have censorship??haha
whymak
A somewhat educated person seldom uses personal anecdotes to generalize. Are you really an educator?
I have visited China off and on for almost 3 decades, but have yet to experience anything in China remotely like what you described. However, I had a similar experience in a Wanchai restaurant in the 60s. I was alone at a table waiting for my party to arrive. Two GIs plopped down at my table. When asked to leave, they stared at me and laughed. This upstate New York college kid was a lot smaller than the bullies. He took another table without cursing or shrieking.
About people doing their thing when nature calls, I am afraid Chinese children aren't the only offenders. Truck drivers plying the US Interstate relief themselves into plastic bags and toss the payload through the window. Imagine if you are the lucky driver right behind on the passing lane.
In Tokyo during the 60s, I saw men micturating on a few occasions in alleys off the main road. Once I did my thing at the urinal, I was discomfited by women walking behind me into the next toilet marked 婦人入用.
Walking back to my hotel after a fun night at Munich's Oktoberfest, I saw a young man peeing at someone's front door.
If you care to traipse down the steps in Paris to the banks of River Seine, your olfactory lobe will likely be temporarily disabled by the overwhelming stench of dog pee.
I don't use my anecdotes to discredit the Yanks, Japanese, French or German.
Just remember, China has 1.3 billion people.
mercedes2233
Agree with your comments.
The writer is not an educator. She only runs after -school programs for children despite her studies at a law School. Her articles show her puerile level of understanding, although SCMP obviously likes her despite our criticisms.
mercedes2233
Agree with your comments.
The writer is not an educator. She only runs after -school programs for children despite her studies at a law School. Her articles show her puerile level of understanding, although SCMP obviously likes her despite our criticisms.
philpaul
Useless article.
mercedes2233
Phony article.
Queenbee99
"Because! We're not part of the same family! That's why!" I practically shrieked in Putonghua.
says the article.
That is hardly civilized behaviour for an educator.
Do not shriek.
brandon.szeto.7
Do not shriek? Are you retarded? Miss.Yang is a normal person. She has feelings like all of us do. Your idiocy has already proven your irrationalness.

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