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Bali Bombings

On October 12, 2002, Bali fell victim to the deadliest act of terrorism in Indonesia's history. Three bombs were detonated in busy nightclubs in the popular Kuta district, killing 202 people and injuring more than 200 others. Among the dead were 11 tourists from Hong Kong, 88 Australians and 38 Indonesians. Members of Jemaah Islamiyah, an extremist Islamist group, were convicted over the bombings and in November 2008 Imam Samudra, Amrozi Nurhasyim and Huda bin Abdul Haq were executed by firing squad.

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Talking Points

Our editors will be looking ahead today to these developing stories ...

PUBLISHED : Friday, 12 October, 2012, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 12 October, 2012, 1:59am

Remembering the Bali bombings

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Colm Toibin speaks at HK Literary Festival

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Rafael Hui and 2 Kwok brothers return to court

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First report on police killings at Lonmin mine

A commission appointed by South African President Jacob Zuma to investigate the killing by police of 34 striking miners at the Lonmin platinum mine in Marikana issues its first monthly report. The violence towards the strikers shocked South Africa, bringing back unhappy memories of the apartheid era. The commission of inquiry is being chaired by Ian Farlam, a retired Supreme Court of Appeal judge, and is due to issue a final report in January.
 

Singapore figures may show recession

Singapore is due to release economic growth statistics that may show that the island republic slipped into recession in the third quarter. Economists polled by Reuters expect the Monetary Authority of Singapore to ease policy slightly by slowing the currency's pace of appreciation against its main trading partners.
 

Most powerful Ferrari yet comes to city

The city's super rich get a glimpse of the latest luxury sports car at an exclusive event at The Repulse Bay when distributor Italian Motors welcomes potential buyers to inspect Ferrari's F12 Berlinetta. Unveiled in March at the Geneva Motor Show, the 12-cylinder, 730-horsepower grand tourer is the most powerful road-legal model ever produced by the Italian firm, which also makes Formula One cars.

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