Paper Talk | South China Morning Post
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Paper Talk

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 06 April, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Saturday, 06 April, 2013, 4:02am

Sunday, Apple Daily

Lab tests find oodles of noodles - but not much rice

Tests for the rice content of products sold as rice noodles at Wellcome supermarkets in Hong Kong have found two samples with only 0.4 grams of protein per 100 grams - suggesting they contain less than 10 per cent rice. The laboratory tests were commissioned by Apple Daily after similar tests were done on products made and sold in Taiwan, with some purported rice noodles found to have no rice content at all. The two sold here with under 10 per cent rice were Hong Kong brand Yu Pin King and Taiwan brand Hsin Tung Yang. Wellcome denied any false advertising. Hsin Tung Yang did not respond to queries.

 

Monday, Oriental Daily

Help sought from retired firefighters for safety checks

The Fire Services Department has reportedly sought approval from the Civil Service Bureau to hire retired firefighters to help check fire safety facilities in more than 10,000 buildings across the city. It came after Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor ordered the fire service and the Buildings Department to inspect all of the city's old buildings this year, following the deadly Fa Yuen Street fire in Mong Kok in 2011. At present, the department has a team of 12 to carry out the task.

 

Tuesday, Ming Pao Daily

Increase in accidents at city's zebra crossings

The number of traffic accidents at zebra crossings has risen 1.3 times in the past four years, Transport Department figures show. Ming Pao reporters who observed the traffic at three zebra crossings where fatal accidents have occurred found that a car failed to let pedestrians cross, on average, every two minutes. The crossings were at City One Sha Tin, Telford Plaza in Kowloon Bay, and Taikoo Shing Road, Island East. At Telford Plaza, they watched as an off-duty traffic policeman was nearly hit by a bus.

 

Wednesday, Ming Pao Daily

Contractors may rack up daily fines for leaving skips by road

The Development Bureau is apparently looking into fining contractors by the day for leaving skips full of construction waste by the roadside. Under the plan, contractors would be liable to pay a daily fine, starting from the day when the Lands Department posts a warning notice on the skip. There have been over 300 casualties caused by skips being left on the side of the road in the past three years, with 71 cases last year, according to Transport Department data.

 

Thursday, The Sun

It's all fun and games - until someone loses an eye

Candy Crush Saga is one of the many mobile phone games winning fans in Hong Kong. No matter where you go - on the train, on the street, in restaurants - people seem to be playing games on their phones. But ophthalmologist Yuen Sheung-ching warns that excessive use of phones to play games has led to a doubling of related eye illnesses. Some 10 per cent of patients with damaged corneas were injured because they did not blink enough while playing such games, Yuen said. And once the cornea was injured, the vision is damaged forever, he said. After long public holidays in particular, he saw more patients seeking help for eye problems, Yuen said.

 

Friday, Oriental Daily

Hard-to-find restaurant told to take down sign near station

A 70-year-old garden-style restaurant in Sha Tin has been ordered to remove a sign from near the station which gives directions to its customers. The Lands Department issued a letter early last month to Lung Wah Hotel, in Ho Wo Che Tsuen, saying the sign had been illegally erected on government land. But Lung Wah said the sign had been there for a decade, and helped its customers to locate the restaurant, which is difficult to find. It argued that removing the sign might hurt its business - and could even result in the restaurant having to close down.

 

Compiled by Nelson Cheng

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