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  • Apr 21, 2014
  • Updated: 10:21pm

Li Keqiang

Li Keqiang, born in 1955, became China's premier in March 2013. Like ex-president Hu Jintao, his power base lies with the Communist Youth League, where he was a member of the secretariat of the league’s central committee in the 1980s and later in the 1990s the secretariat’s first secretary. His regional governance experience includes a period as vice party boss, governor and party boss of Henan province between 1998 and 2003 and party boss of Liaoning province beginning in 2004. He became vice premier in 2008. Li graduated from Peking University with a degree in economics. 

CommentInsight & Opinion

Talking points

Our editors will be looking ahead today to these developing stories ...

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 22 May, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 22 May, 2013, 2:53am

Li Keqiang departs India for Pakistan

Li Keqiang continues his first international tour as premier, arriving in Islamabad for discussions with the new leaders of Beijing's traditional South Asian ally, Pakistan. He is expected to meet Nawaz Sharif, the country's newly elected prime minister, and his talks may lead to the conclusion of a deal to sell a 1,000-megawatt nuclear reactor to the nuclear-armed nation. The reactor deal has raised concerns in Washington.

 

Mother hears verdict in sex abuse case

The Court of First Instance delivers its verdict in the horrifying case of a woman accused of sedating her five-year-old son and handing him over to a paedophile. The 32-year-old clerk, who cannot be named for legal reasons, denied at an earlier hearing one charge of conspiracy to commit buggery. The woman said she had given the boy sedatives to help him sleep.

 

Peter Chan's forgery trial starts

The forgery trial of self-described fung shui master Peter, formerly Tony, Chan Chun-chuen begins in earnest at the Court of First Instance. Chan is accused of forging a will he claimed to be from late Chinachem chairwoman Nina Wang Kung Yu-sum in order to claim her multibillion-dollar fortune. The trial on charges of forgery and using a false instrument is expected to last for 60 days, after several weeks of legal debate.

 

Chinese writer up for international award

China's Yan Lianke is among the 10 finalists for the Man Booker International Prize, an award for a non-British author whose work is available in the English language. Yan, whose work has been banned on the mainland, will give a reading at today's prize ceremony in London. The award is worth £60,000 (HK$708,000), with an additional £15,000 for the translator.

 

EU debates plan to fight tax fraud

European heads of government meet in Brussels, with members of the 27-country European Union expected to agree on an action plan to fight tax fraud globally and within the bloc. The tax evaded each year in EU member states is equivalent to the gross domestic product of Spain, according to Herman van Rompuy, president of the European Council. The leaders will also debate measures to revitalise the continent's stricken economies and boost growth.

 

Chapman brothers' vision of Hell on show

Works by one of the world's most controversial artistic partnerships go on display at the White Cube Gallery in Connaught Road, Central. By British brothers Jake and Dinos Chapman, they include their famous installation Hell and a series of what they call "reworked" paintings - altered prints of works by other artists. The exhibition runs until August 31.

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