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  • Sep 16, 2014
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CommentInsight & Opinion

Hong Kong should live up to its tag of 'world-class city'

Victoria Sung says the embrace of a Hong Kong identity should not mean rejecting the multicultural realities today, if we aspire to be 'world class'

PUBLISHED : Friday, 05 July, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 05 July, 2013, 4:56am

I attended the July 1 protests, braving the rain to observe the scene in Victoria Park. It was exciting to be in a place where civic engagement was energetic, especially when compared with my experience of living in democratic countries where politics is treated with either apathy or frustration.

But, as I walked among the other protesters, I noticed something disturbing. One of the chants taken up by the protesters was, "Hong Kong people are great!"

Hong Kong is a world-class city, or so we're told by the city's slogan. Yet at the protests on July 1, the pan-democracy movement was painting an image of Hong Kong that appeared to be very exclusionary, because it is safe to say that the "Hong Kong people" referred to in the chant excluded those who are not Han Chinese Cantonese speakers.

A truly world-class city is one that is multicultural and has a strong sense of what it means to be a citizen, regardless of race, gender or class. If Hong Kong wants to be respected on the world stage, we have to expand the definition of a Hongkonger.

The refusal to acknowledge those who are not Chinese Cantonese speakers as Hongkongers is dangerous. It is understandable that people are afraid of losing what is unique about Hong Kong - it was reflected in the uproar over the 2008 Olympics announcements being made in Putonghua and not Cantonese.

But the issue goes beyond language. It was truly shocking to see the hatred in public opinion aimed at the Filipino domestic workers who sought Hong Kong residency after living in the city for 25 years. The popular view is that Hongkongers "allow" workers from other countries to come here and that migrant workers are "privileged" to work here.

It is an attitude that would not be readily tolerated elsewhere.

To illustrate this, just replace "Hong Kong" with any other nationality or race. "White people are great!" The result is something that sounds supremacist. To say that one ethnicity or race is superior to others is patriotism at its most extreme.

If we are to say Hong Kong is a world-class city, we cannot stand for this sort of supremacy or intolerance. We have to be more open about what it means to be a Hongkonger.

Throughout history, it has been demonstrated time and time again that people become more fearful and discriminatory during uncertain times. A recent example is the increasingly difficult situation of North African and Arab immigrants living in Europe. Prioritising one group of citizens over another is not simply a matter of pride. The promotion of supremacy, be it of Cantonese-speaking Han Chinese or any other ethnic group, can easily lead to the discrimination and even persecution of minority groups.

Hong Kong has yet to achieve the confidence to exist without the fear of others diluting our cultural identity. We have to ask ourselves: do we really want Hong Kong to stay the way it is? Or, should we continue to evolve and follow the global trend of becoming more multicultural, multiracial and tolerant of differences?

Victoria Sung holds a master's degree in media, culture and communications from New York University and is the founder of Meanwhile in China

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Sticks Evans
Please clarify? Will Hong Kong be a city country after the expiration of the handover agreement? Or a city at that point. Some of my local friends say Hong Kong people would realize it is just a city and move on from all this debate while others say Hong Kong should break away from China but most even admit they are fine with being part of China and conflict with many stories in the news saying people want to be considered Hong Kongers. Please do not be offended. They all said it I did not. I would like your read on do most people here who are not expats or immigrants consider Hong Kong a city or a country? It is an SAR region at the moment and people keep debating but what will happen when 2047 one country, two systems." is scheduled to end? What do you think? I have no personnal stake in it but it is something I would like to understand better. I am in no way an expert on this topic. Just would like someone from here to really explain what will happen in 2047 and what will local people for the most part feel about it? Of course that is over 30 years away but time does fly. Right now people keep debating the vote but that does not change the 50 year timetable. Would be really appreciative to understand what people see happening later? Thank you if you have some thoughts.
wonghln
" saying HK people are great is like saying Americans are great" -- totally agree! In addition, it is only when we're proud of who 'we' are, then we can start to accept and appreciate what 'others' are adding to our identity and culture.
On the other hand though, I believe there are still a sizable population here who cannot accept that those who are from a different race can be a Hongkonger too. I think this is what the author is trying to criticize.
chaz_hen
Honk kong really needs to give up on the "World Class" title game because it will never attain that, for whatever it means. I believe it's already a subjective fact that Singapore is Asia's "World City". With insular, provincial thinking and an economy based on money laundering RMB, smuggling and tax free shopping for mainlanders, HK isn't going to cut it.
However, As long as places like shanghai restrict the free flow of information vital to becoming a financial center and is still under the Great Firewall of the CCP then HK will be a base for international corporations in Asia. God forbid that and high luxury goods taxes ends!
Instead HK should concentrate on its strengths and aim for a more realistic mantra...something like "Hong Kong: China's most information accessible city - until the triads intimidate opposition voices from ever speaking out again.", "Hong Kong: low, low personal taxes" or "Hong Kong: At least It's not Shenyang"
gt63
"Hong Kong: At least it's not Shenyang."
Priceless.
Camel
Hong Kong is great and a worldclass city. Yes, that the outside view (or at least should). What is in the inside? A overpriced, unreasonable expensive city with small living space and area (on purpose), bad educational curricl. compared to international standards, and with people who easily discriminate others Non-Hongkongnese (Non-Cantonese Speaker). That is the reality so the slogan "Hong Kong People are great" does actually only meant for those.

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