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  • November 26, 2014
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  1. Ask the chef

    Posted Sep 07th 2003, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... stocks? There are several methods but the most efficient way is to let your stock come to room temperature (chill it down quickly by putting the container with stock in a larger one filled with iced water), then put it in the fridge. By chilling it, the fat rises to the surface of the stock and you'll have a layer of firm fat that can be lifted off and discarded or kept ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/427178/ask-chef
  2. Food Art- Creations from the Hong Kong Jockey Club's Happy Valley Clubhouse

    Posted Jun 28th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... Tak-yan details some dishes that would be easy for a skilled home cook: chilled sea whelk with cucumber and spring onions and Shanghai pan-fried prawns. Many recipes call for superior stock ... (requiring chicken mousse, chicken stock and pasta dough), roasted frog's legs, garlic puree and chips, parsley foam and deep-fried parsley leaves. There are easier recipes such as grilled ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/685107/food-art-creations-hong-kong-jockey-clubs-happy-valley-clubhouse
  3. Wintry contentment

    Posted May 10th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... be a family-style dish or one elegant enough to be served at banquets, depending on the quality of the soup stock, the ingredients added and the presentation. The soup my mother cooked was made with diluted canned chicken broth, large chunks of winter melon (with the seeds and skin removed), some sliced pork or pork ribs and a few mushrooms. At banquets, the soup is made with superior stock to which ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/679744/wintry-contentment
  4. Game plan

    Posted Nov 15th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... cloves, minced 4 thyme sprigs About 60ml canola oil 1 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour 450ml unsalted chicken stock, preferably home-made 200 grams pearl onions, peeled 30 grams Dijon mustard About ... and cook until the liquid is reduced by half. Add the rabbit legs and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cover the pan then put it in the oven and cook at 180 degrees for about 1? hours or until ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/698382/game-plan
  5. Japanese Cooking- A Simple Art

    Posted Sep 13th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... individual dishes. So the chapter on deep-frying gives recipes on tempura as well as fried pork cutlets (tonkatsu) and the one on soups gives recipes for the basic stocks as well as ways to use them. ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/692348/japanese-cooking-simple-art
  6. The Art of Mexican Cooking

    Posted Jul 05th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... requires commitment from the reader and a well-stocked pantry. It's hard (at least in Hong Kong) to make some of the recipes- those requiring dried corn husks, certain herbs, exotic ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/685869/art-mexican-cooking
  7. Comfort zone

    Posted May 17th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... in salt to taste (at least 11/2 tsp) then transfer the ingredients, with the pandan leaves, to a rice cooker. Add enough stock from cooking the chicken to cover the rice by 2.5cm then cook until done. For the sauce, blend the ginger to a rough paste in a food processor then add the oil, chicken stock and salt to taste. Process until combined then transfer to a bowl. If the sauce is too ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/680601/comfort-zone
  8. An acquired taste

    Posted Apr 19th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... with duck and lamb), puree skinned guava with chopped shallots, garlic, chillies, fresh lime juice and enough water or chicken stock to thin the mixture to a coating consistency. Season whatever ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/677288/acquired-taste
  9. Brief encounter

    Posted Jul 12th 2009, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... such as cayenne, cumin, black pepper and paprika. Cook, stirring constantly, until the spices are toasted and fragrant. Put the lamb back into the pan, add some chopped tomato, lamb or chicken stock ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/686576/brief-encounter
  10. The bitter end

    Posted Aug 31st 2008, 12:00am by Susan Jung

    ... Cut the flesh into rounds, pan-fry on both sides, braise with chicken stock then thicken the juices with a little corn starch. Alternatively, stir-fry the vegetable with black beans, onions, ...

    http://www.scmp.com/article/650927/bitter-end

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