REVIEW
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LIFE

Choreographers Showcase 2014

PUBLISHED : Monday, 01 December, 2014, 5:28pm
UPDATED : Tuesday, 02 December, 2014, 12:35pm

Hong Kong Ballet Cultural Centre Studio Theatre

Reviewed: November 28

 

This programme presents eight short pieces created by dancers from the Hong Kong Ballet. The overall standard was impressive.

All the young choreographers produced pleasing, professional work that made intelligent use of the possibilities offered by classical technique. It was good to see so many big lifts and the girls on pointe.

Yuh Egami and Ricky Hu are already established choreographers and this was evident in their offering, Horn. A duet for a male and female dancer, it involves masks, complex manipulation of fans (one attached upright on top of the man's head like a horn, hence the title) and intricate, interwoven steps which escalate relentlessly as the music grows faster. Original, sophisticated and assured - much credit to Yui Sugiwara and Xia Jun for a brilliant performance.

Watch the Witness by first-time choreographer Frank van Tongeren was well structured, employing its seven dancers in an effective mix of group work and duets, punctuated by striking solos from Naomi Yuzawa.

Jonathan Spigner's WePart was also well structured - an elegiac piece about loss featuring powerful duets from Francesca Loi and Lucas Jerkander, this is his most heartfelt work yet.

Going Home by Li Jiabo was reminiscent of one of those "ballets within a film" that used to feature in Hollywood musicals. A young man bids farewell to his sweetheart, sets out on a journey and finally returns home. Surprisingly romantic in feel, with a couple of delightfully witty scenes at a hotel and on a plane, the piece was commendably ambitious although in need of more development.

In Swan in the Abyss, Jessica Burrows and Sarah Yeung had fun playing with classical stereotypes while Candice Adea's Hernando's Tango was a lively number.

Li Lin's energetic Break Away had some good group work. Most traditional in form was Willem Houck's The Continuous Search for Atman, which showcased the lyricism of Liu Miao-miao and Xia Jun.