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PUBLISHED : Friday, 15 February, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 15 February, 2013, 12:23pm

Style Check: A feather in the cap for creativity

BIO

Fashion Editor Jing Zhang gives you the inside scoop on style trends, Fashion Weeks, industry news and events in Hong Kong, Asia and internationally. There will be live updates from biggest fashion shows and often daily uploads of the best collections and collaborations. Read for the latest insights on top designers, eccentric local labels, plus what is trending in global and Greater China fashion. Jing was born in Guizhou, China and grew up in Hong Kong and England. Follow her on Twitter @jingerzhanger
 

Hongkongers often bemoan the lack of creative design in the city, despite its thriving fashion industry. But while it's true Hong Kong is more about consumption than creation, that may be changing.

Just as art jamming became popular a few years ago, leather workshops have sprung up where people can learn about leatherwork and create basic accessories. Silversmith jewellery workshops have also come and gone.

The latest workshop comes from Hong Kong milliner Awon Golding, who is based in London. Bored with office work, Golding discovered the trade by accident.

"Millinery first blipped on my radar when I made a headpiece to wear to my stepbrother's wedding and realised I really enjoyed it," she says. "What started as a quick fix, because I couldn't find anything in the shops I liked, quickly became a passion. Hats have the ability to transform outfits from ordinary to show-stopping."

Golding arrives this month to hold basic millinery workshops at the Culture Club in SoHo. You can learn how to create your own veiled floral headpiece or how to use feathers and sinamay (an ultra-light material popular in hat-making).

The classes, which run from February 27 to March 20 awongolding.com encourage hands-on creativity guided by an expert who has taught in Britain and France. They provide a glimpse of the craft that goes into hat-making, and - best of all - you get a nifty little addition to your wardrobe that will be your own creation.

Golding, who worked in magazines and fashion before millinery, believes Hong Kong needs more creative thinkers. "These workshops are my small contribution to this," she says.

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