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Arts Preview: Artists at Osage's 'The Imperfect Circle'

Edmund Lee

 

THE IMPERFECT CIRCLE
Osage Gallery

 

The latest group exhibition at Osage Kwun Tong isn't so much a meditation on mathematical impossibility as it is a showcase of often philosophical and deeply personal works by six artists.

They are Carmen Ho and Wong Wai-yin, and the four painters who share the Qiáng Studio in Fo Tan - Ama Huen Ning, Au Hoi-lam, Vivian Poon and Tsang Chui-mei.

A loose extension of their artist-run exhibition "The Perfect Circle", which was presented at Qiáng as part of this January's Fotanian Open Studios, the current group show has a diversity of approaches. Wong is the only new participant of the all-female line-up.

"The English title of the exhibition is simpler in meaning: it brings out the paradoxical relationship between the two words," says Au. "Its Chinese title is closer to the idea and feeling we want to express: it means never-ending and evokes the abundance of possibilities."

Au is exhibiting 12 small-scale paintings on the full stop (the punctuation mark) and 36 digitally manipulated images of "The End" slides from various films.

Tsang's mural Here and now, not yet a circle gives her take on the exhibition title's meaning. Poon is showing five pairs of white curtains she has drawn on, seeking to convey the idea of "repetition with variation" through the circular patterns. Meanwhile, Wong is showcasing A World with Two Moons, an installation consisting of two merry-go-rounds and other objects.

For other artists, the exhibition serves as an ideal platform to tackle intimate subjects that are close to their hearts. Apart from an installation of about 3,000 roses - some fake, some real - which contemplates the theme of imperfection, Ho is also displaying two paintings that reference the ages of herself and her mother, along with small embroideries based on her mother's fingerprints and other related images.

In a similar vein, but on a much larger scale, Huen is presenting a full-sized labyrinth. "My artwork has always been a reflection of myself in every stage of my life," she says of the new series The Redemption of My Soul .

"Ever since I became a mother not too long ago, I had a huge revelation in my life: I feel that my soul has left my body and that I must face my sins and demons. The circle of my life is incomplete, hence an imperfect circle. These three major artworks are rituals that can help me to redeem my soul," says Huen.

edmund.lee@scmp.com

 

Osage Kwun Tong, 5/F, Kian Dai Industrial Building, 73-75 Hung To Road, Kwun Tong, open daily from 10:30am-7pm. Ends September 30. Inquiries: 2793 4817

 

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