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HK Magazine Archive

SUP Yoga, Kiteboarding, Windsurfing and More: 11 Centers to Try Water Sports in Hong Kong

Dive into Hong Kong's aquamarine waters with these water sports.

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 17 August, 2016, 10:45am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 19 October, 2016, 5:22pm

Cheung Chau Windsurfing Center
One of the city’s most famous water sports, windsurfing is one level up from your regular surfing as it requires even more body strength to soar through the waves. The windsurfing center on Hongkongers’ favorite outlying island, Cheung Chau, is owned by the uncle of Lee Lai-shan, Hong Kong’s very first Olympic gold medalist, so you can expect to be taught by the best coaches in town. Beginners’ classes go from $1,500 per person per day for groups of three to five. They also offer kayaks and stand-up paddleboards for rental. Tired from all the sporting? Sit back, enjoy the amazing sea view, and have a bite at their outdoor cafe. 1 Hak Pai Rd., Cheung Chau, 2981-8316, ccwindc.com.hk

Chong Hing Water Sports Centre
This government-run center is located on a large artificial lake ideal for watersports and camping. Set amidst Sai Kung’s stunning scenery, it offers kayaking, dinghy sailing and windsurfing courses and rentals. Land-based facilities include an archery range, a basketball court, a lawn area, a volleyball field, a campfire site, a barbecue site, an assembly hall, sitting-out areas and a kitchen. West Sea Cofferdam, High Island Reservoir, Sai Kung, 2792-6810, lcsd.gov.hk

Jockey Club Wong Shek Water Sports Centre 
Overlooking Long Harbour in Sai Kung East, the waters near this government-run center are ideal for sailing, windsurfing and canoeing with easy access to the open sea and superb coastal scenery. Runs training courses and fun days. Closed Tuesdays. Wong Shek Pier, Sai Kung, 2328-2311, lcsd.gov.hk

Kayak and Hike
Prefer something more laidback? Try kayaking with Kayak and Hike, brainchild of Paul Etherington, who’s been showing off Hong Kong’s amazing coastline to locals and visitors since 1998. Explore the breath-taking Geopark in Sai Kung in groups as the coaches take you through the waters (and on land with a bit of hiking as well), where you can see the unique rock formation and the magnificent marine life of Hong Kong waters up close. A comprehensive seven-hour kayak and hike session is priced at $800 per person. Sai Kung New Pier, Fuk Man Rd., Sai Kung, 9300-5197, kayak-and-hike.com

Kiteboarding Association of Hong Kong
Want to be gone with the wind? Then kiteboarding is the best way to go. This sport is similar to wakeboarding, but it’s totally up to the wind condition of the day and therefore, a lot less predictable. The Kiteboarding Association organizes kiteboarding races regularly, as well as classes for beginners. Learn to fly with their three-day beginner package for $4,500, which covers all you need to know to get up and going on the board, up to completing International Kiteboarding Organization’s kiteboarder level 1 and 2 qualifications. Prefer something lighter on your first trial? Go for their one-day kiteboarding discovery course for $600, which gives you all the information you need to determine if kiteboarding is the sport for you. kiteboarding.org.hk

Sai Sha Watersports Centre 
This privately run place has all sorts of watersports on offer by the hour, including banana boats, kayaks, pedalos, sailing, windsurfing, wakeboarding and assorted toys. Rates are very reasonable, but be sure to make a reservation first. Mo Tat Wan, Lamma Island.,2792-8307, sai-sha.com

South China Diving Club 
You may know about the city’s glorious harbor and the world-renowned skyline, but do you know it’s also home to a wide variety of fish species and coral? Explore deep down of the amazing Hong Kong waters with South China Diving Club, and find out what’s hidden under the sea. The club organizes training and guided dives throughout the year. For beginners, they offer Ocean Diver, entry level course of the British Sub-Aqua Club, which comprises six evenings of classroom and pool sessions, plus four open water days in sheltered open water sites. After you become a qualified diver, you can start exploring the sea with SCDC or advance your skills with their Sports Diver and Advanced Diver training programs. 
Aberdeen Boat Club, 20 Shum Wan Rd., Aberdeen, scdc.org.hk

St. Stephen’s Beach Water Sports Centre 
Once a British military sailing club, this public water sports center in Stanley Bay (overlooking Lamma and Chung Hom Kok peninsula) offers varied conditions throughout the year, from challenging choppy summer seas to calmer waters in cooler weather. It offers kayaks, dinghies and windsurfing boards to rent, and also runs training courses and public competitions. Closed Tuesdays. Wong Ma Kok Path, Stanley, 2813-5407, lcsd.gov.hk

SUP Yoga
Paddle boarding just doesn’t do the trick for you anymore? Try yoga on a paddle board. SUP Yoga takes yoga to a whole new level—as if balancing on dry land wasn’t challenging enough. The serenity of the waters gives you the much needed zen for your yoga practice, as you learn your moves from experience yoga teachers and founders Nadine Bubner and Diana Cheung. There are group 90-minute classes in Stanley and Sai Kung almost every weekend throughout the summer for $500 per person, including board rental. If you prefer something more exclusive, private sessions are also available. supyogahongkong.com

Treasure Island
Hong Kong may not be the most popular surfing destination in the world, but that doesn’t mean you can’t show off your moves on waves. The city has so many beaches, and some of the best for surfing include Big Wave Bay near Shek O and Tai Long Wan (which also happened to mean “a bay with big wave” in Chinese) in Sai Kung. While the sport is popular amongst (hippie) adults, kids aged from 5-15 can also enjoy surfing with Treasure Island’s many surf camps available. Pui O Beach, Lantau Island, 2546-3543, treasureislandhk.com

Wakeboard 
Wakeboarding can be thought of as a combination of water skiing, snowboarding and surfing. The rider is usually towed behind a motorboat or a jet-ski, and travels at speeds between 20 to 50 kilometers per hour. While you can try wakeboarding in plenty of places in Hong Kong (many beginners get to try the sport during summer junk parties), Wakeboard at Tai Tam is perhaps one of the best places to get comprehensive training and to master the sport. They have a team of professional and qualified coaches to teach you how to balance on the board and cut through the waves. A three-hour session for up to six people goes from $2,200 on weekdays. Wakeskating, wakesurfing and flyboarding are also available. Tai Tam Tuk Village, Tai Tam, 9454-5772, wakeboard.com.hk