• Thu
  • Aug 28, 2014
  • Updated: 10:12am

North Korea nuclear test

On February 12, 2013, North Korea unleashed its third - and largest - underground nuclear test, causing an earthquake with a magnitude of 4.9. The Foreign Ministry in Pyongyang said the test was the "first response" to what it called US threats. The test defied a UN move tightening sanctions against leader Kim Jong-un's regime three weeks before. The UN Security Council strongly condemned the test and vowed to take action against Pyongyang for an act that all major world powers, including traditional ally China, denounced.

NewsAsia
NORTH KOREA

China urges ‘restraint’ after North Korea scraps peace pact

North Korea ends all non-aggression pacts with Seoul after UN Security Council adopts tough new sanctions

PUBLISHED : Friday, 08 March, 2013, 10:01am
UPDATED : Saturday, 09 March, 2013, 2:31am

China called for “calm and restraint” on Friday after North Korea responded to new UN sanctions with fresh threats of nuclear war and promises to scrap peace agreements.

“China calls on relevant parties to exercise calm and restraint, and avoid actions that might further escalate tensions,” foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters in Beijing.

“The current situation on the peninsula is highly complex and sensitive” and China “expresses concern”, she said, re-iterating Beijing’s longstanding position.

Beijing is Pyongyang’s sole major ally and by far its biggest trading partner, including being its primary energy supplier, but voted Thursday for the UN resolution that stiffened sanctions against the North following its nuclear test last month.

“We believe the resolution is a balanced one,” Hua said at a regular briefing. “China is objective and fair on this matter and has played a constructive role throughout the discussion at the Security Council.”

China has always “seriously” implemented UN Security Council resolutions, she added, and re-iterated Beijing’s call for a return to the six-party talks that bring together the US, both Koreas, Japan and Russia. The forum has been moribund since 2009.

China calls on relevant parties to exercise calm and restraint, and avoid actions that might further escalate tensions 

Chinese trade and aid have enabled the government in Pyongyang to survive since the 1950-53 Korean war, which historians estimate killed as many as 400,000 Chinese troops.

In China’s strategic thinking, North Korea is a “buffer zone” that prevents the 28,500 US troops stationed in South Korea encroaching on its own border.

But analysts say that Pyongyang’s actions mean the relationship risks becoming an irritant for Beijing.

North Korea announced earlier on Friday it was voiding non-aggression pacts with South Korea and severing a hotline with Seoul, hours after the UN Security Council adopted tough new sanctions on Pyongyang.

The announcement ramped up tensions on the Korean peninsula that have surged since the North staged a third nuclear test last month. On Thursday, the country threatened a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the United States.

Pyongyang is no stranger to bellicose rhetoric, but the tone has reached a frenzied pitch in recent days, fuelling concerns that it might trigger a border incident, with both North and South planning major military exercises next week.

North Korea “abrogates all agreements on non-aggression reached between the North and the South”, the state-run Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea (CPRK) said in a statement.

The main bilateral non-aggression pact was signed in 1991, endorsing the peaceful settlement of disputes and the prevention of accidental military clashes.

“It also notifies the South side that it will immediately cut off the North-South hotline,” said the statement, which was carried by the official Korean Central News Agency.

North Korea has threatened to sever the phone link -- installed in 1971 -- many times, and has actually done so twice before, South Korea’s Unification Ministry noted.

Pyongyang’s latest announcement came hours after the UN Security Council beefed up existing sanctions on the communist state in response to its February 12 nuclear test.

The resolution adopted by the 15-member Council added new names to the UN sanctions blacklist and tightened restrictions on North Korea’s financial dealings, notably its suspect “bulk cash” transfers.

Earlier resolutions gave states the right to inspect cargo suspected to contain weapons material. Those inspections will become mandatory.

The new sanctions will “bite hard”, said the US ambassador to the UN, Susan Rice. “They increase North Korea’s isolation and raise the cost to North Korea’s leaders of defying the international community.”

China wants “full implementation” of the resolution, said its UN envoy Li Baodong, while stressing that efforts must be made to bring North Korea back to negotiations and to defuse tensions.

Prior to the Security Council meeting, the North Korean Foreign Ministry had threatened a “pre-emptive nuclear attack” against the United States and all other “aggressors”.

The United States responded by saying it was “fully capable” of defending itself and its allies -- including South Korea -- against any North Korean missile strike.

The CPRK statement condemned the UN resolution -- drafted by the United States and the North’s sole major ally, China – as proof that Washington and its “puppets” in Seoul were “hell bent” on confrontation.

“North-South relations have gone so far beyond the danger line that they are no longer repairable and an extremely dangerous situation is prevailing on the Korean Peninsula where a nuclear war may break out right now,” it said.

The statement warned that the North Korean military would respond “mercilessly” to any intrusion -- “even an inch” – into its land, sea or air space.

An annual US-South Korea exercise known as Foal Eagle began on March 1 and continues until April 30, involving more than 10,000 US troops along with a far greater number of South Korean personnel.

And a largely computer-simulated joint exercise called Key Resolve will be held from March 11-21.

Meanwhile, South Korea’s defence ministry said the North was gearing up for nationwide military manoeuvres of its own next week, involving all three wings of its armed forces.

In a separate report Friday, KCNA said North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un had visited a frontline military unit involved in a deadly skirmish with the South in 2010.

During his inspection on Thursday, Kim declared the North was ready for all-out war and that he would order attacks in all frontline areas in case of any provocation.

 

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This article is now closed to comments

layhoma2
Hong Kong is not safe if those peevish and belligerent war mongers turned suicidal and start throwing dirty bombs around their neighbors (obviously they can't reach the US). I don't normally believe in wars where needless lives are lost but desperate time requires desperate measures. The US should launch a few EMS warheads into their land, disabling all their electronics and set them back 2 decades, simultaneously send a few precision guided missiles to knock out all their military outposts and nuclear sites and a few bunker busters to take out all their Generals and Leaders. Let China take over and switch their chubby leader picture with China leader as their new idol to worship. In return, the US should ask for China to cease all disputes over those petty islands with Japan. Now everybody wins!
kohlyang
I hope can see some actions, not just words
LunarRepublic
Likely Kim's just having a temper tantrum. North Korea knows they can't face the United States-Korean-Japanese ****nal combined; to threaten them is basically political suicide.
jenniepc
I am very pleased that China and the United States work together to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. I do not want to throw cold water on the resolution at the United Nations. But this is the fourth resolution on the issue of North Korea and The North Korean leadership has not changed their behavior.
We pledge of more UN Security Council action and North Korea does more nuclear test. I do not think if it isn’t our best interest to adding fuel to the fire by doing more sanctions?! It does not deter North Korea from pursuing its nuclear weapons program if Washington remains hostile. We should change our tactic and we should talk to North Korea directly to resolve the Korean nuclear crisis. I will take North Korean leaders’ rhetoric of a pre-emptive nuclear strike seriously, especially, when Korean people have nothing to lose.
Korean people are persistent manner or obstinate and intractable people an excessive pride in their appearance or achievement with a strong will. Even if China would have halted any humanitarian assistants to North Korea, it would not change North Korean leaders’ behavior yet it would destabilize North and North Korean leaders would be more aggressive, a driving force by an indignation or desperate, toward to South Korea, US as well as China and will destabilize the Asian continent. We should not forget that thousands and thousands of North Korean refugees would inflow into China.
Jennie PC Chiang/江佩珍 03/08/13 美國
 
 
 
 
 

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