• Sat
  • Jul 12, 2014
  • Updated: 4:27pm

Japanese Tsunami 2011

On March 11, 2011, a devastating 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, claiming the lives of more than 15,000 people. It was the most powerful known earthquake ever to have hit Japan, and one of the five most powerful earthquakes in the world. In the aftermath, a state of emergency was declared following the failure of the cooling system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in the evacuation of nearby residents. Radiation levels inside the plant were up to 1,000 times normal levels, and those outside the plant were up to eight times normal levels. 

NewsAsia
JAPAN

Ex-boss of tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant dies of cancer

Masao Yoshida led efforts to prevent bigger disaster after tsunami hit reactors

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 10 July, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 10 July, 2013, 11:04pm

The former boss of Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, who stayed at his post to try to tame runaway reactors after the 2011 tsunami, died of cancer yesterday.

Masao Yoshida, 58, was at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) station on March 11, 2011, when towering waves swamped cooling systems and sparked meltdowns that released plumes of radiation. He was admitted to hospital in November.

Yoshida led the effort to get the crippled complex under control, as workers battled frequent aftershocks.

Government plans revealed after the event showed how scientists feared a chain reaction if Fukushima spiralled out of control that could have seen other plants engulfed and would have seen Tokyo evacuated.

He had to make a decision that most of the on-site workers should leave because the situation was getting worse and he also had to have some of his staff remain to work with him. That was probably the hardest decision he ever had to make

His selfless work contrasts with the attitude of his employers, who seemed willing to abandon the complex.

"I cannot imagine how hard it was for him," Tatsujiro Suzuki, vice-chairman of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, said. "He had to make a decision that most of the on-site workers should leave because the situation was getting worse and he also had to have some of his staff remain to work with him. That was probably the hardest decision he ever had to make."

Tepco said his oesophagal cancer was unlikely to be linked to radiation exposure in the months after the disaster. Soon after surgery for cancer, Yoshida had a brain haemorrhage.

Additional reporting by Bloomberg

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