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  • Dec 28, 2014
  • Updated: 6:54am

North Korea

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea is a country in East Asia, located in the northern half of the Korean Peninsula bordering South Korea and China. Its capital, Pyongyang, is the country's largest city by both land area and population. It is a single-party state led by the Korean Workers' Party (KWP), and governed by Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un since 2012. It has a population of 24,052,231 (UN-assisted DPRK census 2008) made up of Koreans and a smaller Chinese minority. Japan 'opened' Korea in 1876 and annexed it in 1910. The Republic of Korea (ROK) was founded with US support in the south in August 1948 and the Soviet-backed Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) in the north in September that year. 

NewsAsia

North Korea blames war games for cancellation of US envoy’s visit

Pyongyang says military exercises between Washington and Seoul are behind the withdrawal of an invitation to discuss the fate of a US citizen imprisoned in North Korea

PUBLISHED : Monday, 02 September, 2013, 3:49pm
UPDATED : Monday, 02 September, 2013, 4:05pm
 

North Korean has withdrawn its invitation to a US envoy to visit the country to discuss the case of a detained American because Washington perpetrated a “grave provocation” by allegedly mobilising nuclear-capable bombers during recent military drills the US conducted with Seoul.

Analysts said the moves signal possible informal negotiations between the two countries over Kenneth Bae were not going smoothly, with Pyongyang in all likelihood seeking concessions from Washington in return for releasing the American.

Robert King, the US special envoy for North Korean human rights, had been scheduled to travel to Pyongyang on Friday for talks on Bae, a 45-year-old tour operator and Christian missionary who has been detained since November for committing “hostile acts”. He was sentenced in April to 15 years hard labour.

An unidentified North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said in remarks carried by state media late on Saturday that his country intended to allow King’s visit even though the US and South Korea were conducting annual military drills.

But he said the US “beclouded the hard-won atmosphere of humanitarian dialogue in a moment” by allegedly flyingB-52H strategic bombers in the sky above the peninsula during the exercises. He called it “the most blatant nuclear blackmail against us”.

The North Korean statement “may be the result of the fact that compromises are not being struck smoothly in US-North Korea negotiations” over what North Korea wants for releasing Bae, said Lim Eul-chul, a professor at South Korea’s Kyungnam University, adding that conditions could include things such as the shipment of aid or the start of formal talks on improving ties.

North Korea appears to be trying to gain leverage over the US by delaying King’s trip, but it should eventually allow the visit because it needs improved ties with the outside world to revive its economy, Lim said.

Analysts say North Korea has previously used detained Americans as bargaining chips in its stand-off with the US over its nuclear and missile programmes.

International disarmament talks on ending North Korea’s nuclear ambitions have been stalled since 2009 and efforts by Washington to negotiate a freeze in the North’s nuclear programme in exchange for food aid collapsed 18 months ago.

King’s planned trip raised prospects for improved relations between the wartime foes, as it would have been the first public trip by a US administration official to the reclusive nation in more than two years.

The annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian drills, which ended on Friday, were computer-simulated war games that US and South Korea say are defensive in nature but which North Korea calls a rehearsal for an invasion. The US military command in Seoul did not immediately comment on the North Korean statement.

Earlier this year, the US took the unusual step of sending nuclear-capable B-52 and B-2 bombers to participate in springtime military drills with South Korea as tension was running high after the release of a series of statements containing warlike rhetoric from North Korea, including vows to launch a nuclear war. The flights drew an angry response from Pyongyang. Animosities have since eased, with Pyongyang moderating its statements and seeking closer diplomatic ties with Seoul and Washington.

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said on Friday the US was “surprised and disappointed by North Korea’s decision” and remains gravely concerned about Bae’s health. Bae’s family expressed disappointment but said they were holding on to their faith North Korean and US diplomats would resume talks soon. Bae suffers from multiple health problems.

Bae is at least the sixth American detained in North Korea since 2009. The others were eventually allowed to leave without serving their full prison terms, with some releases coming after prominent Americans, including former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, visited North Korea.

 

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