• Sun
  • Dec 21, 2014
  • Updated: 9:26am
Malaysia Airlines flight 370
NewsAsia
Flight MH370

Malaysia to release satellite data on missing MH370 jet

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 20 May, 2014, 1:11pm
UPDATED : Tuesday, 20 May, 2014, 1:11pm

Malaysia says it will publicly release satellite data used to narrow down the search for the missing jetliner to the southern Indian Ocean.

The Civil Aviation Department and British company Inmarsat said in a joint statement on Tuesday said they would do this “in line with our commitment to greater transparency.”

Some family members of the 239 people on the plane have demanded raw satellite data to be made public for independent analysis.

The government says calculations using Inmarsat data showed Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 ended in the Indian Ocean after it went missing March 8 while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing along with its 239 passengers and crew more than two months ago.

Malaysia’s government has said satellite data indicates the plane probably diverted to the Indian Ocean and crashed after running out of fuel.

But nothing has been found despite weeks of extensive searches at the surface and on the seabed. Malaysia has said it would review the satellite data and reassess the search, possibly deploy more undersea search assets.

Authorities believe the plane was flown deliberately off course, but are still investigating the cause of the disappearance.

Malaysia has announced no findings from various investigations into what caused MH370’s disappearance.

Surveys have suggested most Malaysians suspect the corruption-prone government is hiding something, while one in 10 Americans believe “space aliens, time travellers or beings from another dimension” were involved, according to an earlier CNN poll.

Leading theories being probed by investigators include a possible hijacking, rogue pilot action or mechanical failure.

Pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah, 53, came under scrutiny amid unsubstantiated reports that he was upset over a jail sentence handed to Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim hours before the plane took off or was suicidal due to personal problems.

But his brother-in-law Asuad Khan, in an interview on Monday with Australian Broadcasting Corporation, denied Zaharie suffered any emotional problems and suggested he was being used as a scapegoat.

Agence France-Presse, Associated Press

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jiawang@adb.org
What a funny little country.
Don't they have any adults as leaders?

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