• Sun
  • Sep 21, 2014
  • Updated: 7:08am
Malaysia Airlines flight 370
NewsAsia
Flight MH370

Emirates chief asks why no fighter jet intercepted missing flight MH370

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 03 June, 2014, 12:50pm
UPDATED : Monday, 09 June, 2014, 9:28am

Emirates chief Tim Clark has reportedly questioned why fighter jets did not intercept Malaysia Airlines flight 370 when it veered widely off course, but said he believed the missing plane will be found.

Clark said that more information on the disappearance of the Boeing jet, which was carrying 239 people from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, was needed before the industry changes its aircraft tracking procedures.

The Emirates boss told The Australian Financial Review at an annual airlines conference in Doha that the plane would have been intercepted by military aircraft if it had flown off course over other countries.

“If you were to fly from London to Oslo and then over the North Sea you turned off and then went west to Ireland, within two minutes you’d have Tornadoes, Eurofighters, everything up around you,” he said.

“Even if you did that over Australia and the US, there would be something up. I’m not quite sure where primary radar was in all of this.”

His comments came as the International Air Transport Association conference looked at ways of improving the tracking of aircraft through flight data transmissions or technologies to monitor their movements.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation has also formed a working group to explore tracking methods.

“In my view we are all plunging down a path that [says] ‘we have got to fix this’,” Clark said. “This is the door closing after the horse has gone 25 miles down the track.

“We need to know more about what actually happened to this aeroplane and do a forensic second-by-second analysis of it. I think we will find it and get to the bottom of it.”

Australia is leading the hunt for MH370, which is believed to have crashed in the Indian Ocean, but there have been no signs of the plane since it vanished over the South China Sea on March 8 despite an intense air, sea and underwater search.

Malaysia’s air force has acknowledged that military radar tracked what it called an “unidentified object” - later determined to be MH370 - crossing back through Malaysian airspace and out toward the Indian Ocean after the plane diverted.

The air force said it took no action because the aircraft was not deemed “hostile”, drawing heavy criticism over the lost opportunity to intercept or further track the plane.

Malaysia’s government has defended the air force decision, without elaborating on how it was made, but Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein has said military procedures would be reviewed in the wake of MH370.

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This article is now closed to comments

asiaseen
Short of news today? This story was published a week ago and there is nothing new in it.
538ec640-2880-4677-906c-08d20a3209ca
Listen people, simple fact here on cell phones; if your cell phone
A) Burns up or melts, it does not ring or connect. The person attempting to call you simply gets "so and so cannot accept calls at this time"
B) Is submerged in water, will not ring or connect either, exact same as above.
Both instances will also disconnect people from social media networks within an hour or so after inactivity. Here is the kicker, callers were still getting rings on the passengers cell phones, and they were still shown to be on social media sites days later.
Given these 2 facts, we know the plane did not crash, was not shot down, nor ended up in the Ocean. The fighter jets that were tracking Flight 370 did not shoot it down, it was escorted.
Here is an interesting little tidbit of info some of you might not be aware of: AWACS planes. These have the ability to remotely take control of planes fitted for it (which Flight 370 was). They also have the ability to both hide from and jam radar.
Diego Garcia also has one of these planes sitting at it's base.. Flight 370 also had the fuel to make it there. Flight 370 did NOT have the fuel to make it to where they are speculated to have crashed in the Indian Ocean. That area is about 1.5x farther than the entire fuel load Flight 370 was capable of holding.
buk1818
Exactly, best theory yet. Cell phone evidence.
rudy.haugeneder
Was MH370 shot down? It may have already sort of been said by Australian officials.

" We're not searching for a needle in a haystack. We're still trying to define where the haystack is," Mark Binskin, vice chief of the Australian Defence Force, told reporters in late April. 

So, why didn't some reporter at the news conference ask him the obvious question: "Does that mean the wrong area -- the wrong ocean -- is being searched for wreckage?"
538e28f0-1a50-4e81-b39d-08d90a3209ca
The plane was followed by fighter jets, that has already been confirmed. It was shown on both FlightRadar instances, one of which they tried to cover up.
Now were these fighter jets friendly? Obviously not, or we would have heard from the offending country by now.
Is Malaysia going to scramble up it's own fighter jets to intercept or take on the fighter jets following flight 370? Hell no.
Selective media reporting. Reporting everything but the facts.
mooney59
Well, you obviously don't know Asia and in particular Malaysia..
wailunscmp
don't know why the media doesn't report on the fact that the aircraft was tracked on Malaysian primary military radar but it was only for a few tens of minutes. anyone who understand a little about the geographical distance between the east coast of peninsular Malaysia and the last known position on military radar was only a few hundred kilometres. this means it only takes less than 30 minutes to fly that distance for an aircraft that was travelling around 800 kmh. it's a narrow strip of land and airspace. by the time the Malaysian airforce can scramble any figher aircraft to intercept any UFO, it's out of Malaysian territory. do you know how long it takes to scramble up an interceptor? in a non-war footing, it'll take at least 20 minutes. furthermore, this region of Malaysia overlaps several friendly ASEAN countries and there's no military threats from these neighbours. also, US and Chinese military planes regularly fly over these areas incognito. what's lost to most people and the media is this is a peacful region that hasn't seen war or faced any threat of war since WW2 (except for local insurgencies). it's not like Europe, the US, South Asia or North Asia. one may argue that the Malaysian airforce is incompetant but then again this missing aircraft flew across the border between Malaysia and Thailand. now that's hard to judge if fighters should be scrambled especially it it's a passing "friendly"
andreaswagner
“If you were to fly from London to Oslo and then over the North Sea you turned off and then went west to Ireland, within two minutes you’d have Tornadoes, Eurofighters, everything up around you,” he said.

Yes, but that is in EUROPE and not in ASIA mate.
likingming
within TWO minutes you’d have Tornadoes, Eurofighters ?
I think it would be missiles instead.
asiaseen
I have spent a lot of time on fighter Quick Reaction Alert in the UK. Take it from me, you are talking s-hit.
 
 
 
 
 

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