• Tue
  • Dec 23, 2014
  • Updated: 10:16am
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Chinese student leads Los Angeles police on high-speed chase

Student claims that he "did not understand" why he had been chased

PUBLISHED : Friday, 21 February, 2014, 10:28pm
UPDATED : Monday, 24 February, 2014, 2:04pm
 
 

An 18-year-old Chinese driver and two passengers were pulled from a BMW by armed police after a high-speed chase along California's Pacific Highway Coast, where speeds reached almost 200km/h.

Traffic officers originally flagged the BMW 7 Series at around 8.30pm outside of downtown Los Angeles for allegedly weaving between traffic lanes and speeding, NBC Los Angeles reported.

After the BMW driver ignored police requests to stop, a chase along two Los Angeles freeways began. 

Officers finally managed to stop the BMW by deliberately shunting its back bumper - a technique used to disable escaping vehicles.

The manoeuvre caused the BMW to swerve to the shoulder of the road, where the driver finally stopped and surrendered at about 9.15pm. 

The driver was identified in reports as "an 18-year-old UC Irvine student from China".

He allegedly told NBC reporters after his arrest that his BMW "was a new car and he obtained his driver's license about two months ago".

Allegedly, he also said that he was "afraid of the California Highway Patrol" and "did not understand" why he had been chased. 

The identity of the student, his two passengers and the charges they face have yet to be revealed by UC Irvine or local authorities.

According to NBC's report, the student obeyed the majority of traffic lights during the chase, indicating that the charges he faces will likely be less severe than they would be otherwise.

 

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This article is now closed to comments

HK-Lover
A young boy from China causing sort of trouble that occurs in Los Angeles every day being reported in SCMP on the front page ?
Why could that possibly be of any interest to HK people and SCMP readers at all ? And why on the front page ?
tkruemmer
This is exactly the Chinese mentality problem. In China you have money, you are above the law. So, the spoiled off-spring thinks the same way.
joao.monteiro.10888938
Young people with lots of money very often are like that, chinese and not chinese
Bo Xilai
According to KTLA, he's eighteen years old and his name is Yuan Zhou... I guess he was driving a Series 7 BMW...
More horsepower than brains... He's lucky he didn't get shot.
bagelbagel
Perhaps the son of a high ranking party member?..
lucifer
Being an out of state student at a UC school is quite expensive. I think its more than USD $40K per year. So, maybe you a re right. This is not something that most Mainland Chinese could afford.
HiggsSinglet
Most likely a corrupted officials son!!! Did he name his father?
tkruemmer
This is exactly the Chinese mentality problem. In China if you have money, you are above the law. So, the spoiled off-spring thinks the same. The method how to deal with it is the same as used in China: Get down on them, hard.
chaz_hen
Not necessarily. Just the kid of someone with more money than sense and never home to properly raise the child in a normal environment.
sinohog
Police in the U.S. don't shoot unarmed ppl unless they are using their car as a weapon and are an immediate risk of harming someone, not trying to flee. I'm surprised that they didn't set up a road block. Must have been a lot of traffic. No there aren't any untouchable license plates here like in the mainland. There are too many ppl here with camera phones that can snap photos of license plates of speeding cars along with video of them speeding. Regardless whether or not the police catch them. such video, once authenticated as unaltered by the police, is admissible in court. If he is a son of a diplomat, that is a different matter as his father or mother has immunity. If that were the case, I would suspect that the student will be deported once he is convicted if immunity doesn't apply to him; but that depends on how serious the charges are and what laws that he broke, and up to U.S. immigration. If he is the son of a diplomat and the son does have immunity, I suspect the state dept. would lean on the diplomat to send him home. But I'm not an immigration lawyer. All that I can tell you is that he is in deep water. I'm sure that there are plenty of US licensed immigration lawyers who could elaborate on how deep that water might be. I'm just throwing out some reasons why one's son would even want to think about doing that and why buying Junior a fast car isn't such a good idea.

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