• Thu
  • Dec 25, 2014
  • Updated: 11:05am

Beijing air pollution

The Chinese capital has for many years suffered from serious air pollution. Primary sources of pollutants include exhaust emission from Beijing's more than five million motor vehicles, coal burning in neighbouring regions, dust storms from the north and local construction dust. A particularly severe smog engulfed the city for weeks in early 2013, elevating public awareness to unprecedented levels and prompting the government to roll out emergency measures. 

NewsChina

Where has Beijing gone? Thick smog engulfs northern China

PUBLISHED : Friday, 11 January, 2013, 10:57am
UPDATED : Tuesday, 22 January, 2013, 8:50am
 

The Chinese capital has been smothered in thick, foul-smelling smog for the past few days, the first pollution spike in 2013.

Air quality ratings for the city have ranged between “very unhealthy” and “hazardous” since Thursday, according to @BeijingAir, a twitter account run by the US embassy in Beijing.

The account regularly posts air pollution readings from monitors installed on embassy grounds in downtown Beijing.

As of 10am on Friday, the monitors showed a PM2.5 fine-particle pollutants reading of 377 and an ozone level reading of 419.

By comparison, the 9pm readings for PM2.5 and ozone in Hong Kong’s Central/Western region, among the most polluted on the island, were 60.7 and 20.8 respectively, according to the website of Hong Kong’s Environmental Protection Department.

Similar levels of heavy pollution were reported for cities across northern China on Thursday, with Hebei province, which surrounds Beijing, being the worst hit.

“It is expected that air pollution in Beijing will remain heavy during the day time today… people are advised to stay indoors as much as possible,” China’s state TV quoted Beijing’s environmental protection centre as saying.

However, the pollution doesn’t seem to have caused any major disruptions at the Capital International Airport in Beijing.

The airport’s website showed that since yesterday most inbound flights have landed on time or with only minor delays. Beijing-bound flights from Hong Kong International Airport also seem to be mostly on time. 

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newgalileo
According to the U.S. Embassy, levels have been pretty much in the 400 - 500 range. I thought I was recovered from a long cold and yesterday I started coughing again. And Hong Kong people get upset with readings under 100... It is tough in Beijing really, despite the massive construction of subways. Yesterday I tried the new Line 6, a great addition to the network

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