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  • Oct 2, 2014
  • Updated: 7:42am
NewsChina

Chinese student charged over fatal US car crash 'released on US$2 million bail'

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 05 March, 2013, 2:47pm
UPDATED : Tuesday, 05 March, 2013, 4:21pm

A Chinese student facing charges in the United States over a fatal car accident was released from custody after his family paid US$2 million (HK$15.51 million) bail, according to reports.

Xu Yichun, 19, allegedly drove his Mercedes-Benz at high speed in residential areas of Des Moines before crashing into another car on November 10 last year. The driver of the car later died in hospital and three other passengers in it were injured, according to US reports. 

News of his release last Friday generated a flurry of interest on Chinese social media on Tuesday morning - the first day of new sessions of China’s National People’s Congress. Many were concerned that the court might not get Xu Yichun back to the US if he returns to China. There is no extradition treaty between the US and China.

A microblogger, called “Pretending in New York” and describing himself as living in the US, shared a report by www.kirotv.com on Sina Weibo, a Chinese Twitter-style site, on Tuesday morning. The report revealed more details about Xu Yichun’s background from the Hong Kong-based Sing Tao Daily.

The report by a Sing Tao Daily reporter in San Francisco said Xu Yichun was from a rich family. His father, Xu Zhaohong, was the chief executive of taxchina.com, a prominent mainland tax and accounting firm.

“[Some of] the second generation of China’s rich families are trouble makers in other countries,”  said “Pretending in New York” - which attracted a lot of praise from Chinese netizens.

The post generated more than 1,500 comments and re-posts in just couple of hours before it was deleted. Many Chinese netizens who shared the post blamed Xu Yichun for his carelessness and wealthy background, saying he should be jailed in the US and not return to China.

But many of their posts were deleted.

According to US media reports, Xu Yichun was allegedly driving at the speed of 70mph in local residential areas and ran through a stop sign before hitting the other car.

Xu Yichun did not have an international driving licence and had no previous experience driving in the US.

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Downtown David
When he was awarded bail, he probably had to relinquish his passport, so he cannot flee the country
Anyway, he looks like he is in a heap of trouble, and will have to pony up for a good defense lawyer. There is a good chance he will spend time in an Iowa prison.
IOWA VEHICULAR HOMICIDE LAWS
Class B Felony
A vehicular homicide conviction for operating while intoxicated is a Class B Felony, carrying a mandatory prison term of 25 years. The judge has no choice but to send the person to prison for 25 years. There is no possibility of probation.
Class C Felony
A lesser charge of vehicular homicide is also available for situations where the State cannot prove that a person operated while intoxicated. In these situations they can charge a driver in a fatality accident with vehicular homicide by way of reckless driving. In these cases the State is required to prove the defendant unintentionally caused the death of another by operating a motor vehicle in a reckless manner; in a way that showed demonstrated a willful and wanton disregard for the safety of others. In other words, the person knew and recognized the risk of their driving behavior but did it anyway. Vehicular homicide by reckless driving is a Class C Felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Probation is a possibility in these cases.
jayb
dude, this is state of washington. iowa laws DO NOT apply.
des moines wa is a suburb near the seatac airport. and you are piling up a stack of iowa laws on us? you are being funny -:)
chaz_hen
Well...I suppose a forfeited US$2 million isn't going to be a big dent for his father's wallet. He'll never be able to go back to the US legally ever again, though...
 
 
 
 
 

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