• Sat
  • Dec 27, 2014
  • Updated: 4:35am
H7N9 avian flu
NewsChina
PUBLIC HEALTH

China reports another H7N9 death as WHO calls flu 'one of the most lethal'

PUBLISHED : Thursday, 02 May, 2013, 8:53am
UPDATED : Thursday, 29 August, 2013, 4:13am
 

The death toll from the H7N9 bird flu virus has risen to 27, state media said yesterday after a man died in Hunan province.

Neighbouring Guangdong will start cleaning up its poultry markets today. Deputy governor Lin Shaochun said yesterday that the provincial government might make some contingency public health measures permanent in prevention of bird flu diseases, Xinhua reported.

Dr Ko Wing-man, Hong Kong's food and health secretary, has led a team of experts to Beijing yesterday to review the cross-border control measures.

The delegation is expected to meet the National Health and Family Planning Commission and the State General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine. It will return to Hong Kong today.

A 55-year-old Hunan patient died on Wednesday after receiving medical treatment, Xinhua said, citing local authorities.

More than 120 people have been diagnosed with the virus since it was first reported in late March, with most cases confined to eastern China.

The only one reported outside the mainland has been in Taiwan. That victim was infected on the mainland, but led to Asian countries urging renewed vigilance against the virus.

Experts fear the possibility of the virus mutating into a form easily transmissible between humans, with the potential to trigger a pandemic.

The World Health Organisation has said there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission but warned that H7N9 is one of the most lethal viruses.

View H7N9 map in a larger map

Click on each balloon for more information on individual patients infected: blue, patients infected with the H7N9 virus under treatment; red, those infected with H7N9 who have died; yellow, those who have fully recovered; and pink, those infected other types of the Influenza A virus, including H1N1.

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