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  • Updated: 12:24am

Zhou Yongkang

Born in 1942, Zhou was secretary of the Political and Legislative Affairs Committee of the party’s Central Committee from 2007 to 2012. He spent 18 years in Liaoning province working on geophysical exploration before being promoted to mayor of Panmian city. Other positions he held include vice minister of the petroleum industry (1985-1988), minister of land and resources (1998-1999), and Sichuan party boss (1999-2002). In 2002 he became head of the Ministry of Public Security and was made a member of the Politburo’s standing committee in 2007. Zhou is an engineering graduate.

 

NewsChina

China targets deputy police minister Li Dongsheng for corruption

Vice-minister of public security Li Dongsheng latest close associate of Zhou Yongkang to fall as part of widening nationwide investigation

PUBLISHED : Friday, 20 December, 2013, 8:52pm
UPDATED : Saturday, 21 December, 2013, 3:26am

A deputy national police chief with close ties to former security tsar Zhou Yongkang has become the latest target in a widening corruption probe that has shaken the highest levels of the ruling Communist Party.

The party's Central Committee for Discipline Inspection announced last night that Li Dongsheng - one of nine vice-ministers responsible for domestic security in the country of 1.35 billion - was suspected of serious violations of party rules and state laws. The agency provided no details about the investigation.

Li, who ranked third in the security ministry, is the second member of the decision-making Central Committee to fall from grace as part of the massive investigation. Several close associates of Zhou's have already placed under investigation.

The announcement came amid a swirl of reports in recent days that the party leadership was preparing to announce an unprecedented corruption investigation into Zhou, who was one of China's most powerful politicians over the past decade.

We can interpret this as a move to target someone higher up. It's like a skirmish to push the war from the periphery to the power centre
Sun Yat-sen University politics professor Xiao Bin

"We can interpret this as a move to target someone higher up," said Sun Yat-sen University politics professor Xiao Bin. "It's like a skirmish to push the war from the periphery to the power centre."

The South China Morning Post reported in August that President Xi Jinping and other top party leaders had authorised an investigation into Zhou, who retired last year as a member of the supreme Politburo Standing Committee, as part of broad nationwide anti-corruption campaign.

Zhou associates targeted by graft watchdogs include Jiang Jiemin , who, as head of the regulator overseeing state-owned enterprises, was also a Central Committee member.

Despite lacking any previous law enforcement experience, Li was appointed vice-minister of public security in 2009. Zhou was at the time secretary of the party's Central Politics and Law Commission, which oversees the Ministry of Public Security.

Li spent 22 years working at China Central Television, eventually rising to deputy chief of the state broadcaster. He served as vice-minister of the party's propaganda department before securing the public security post.

A person close to the Supreme People's Procuratorate, the country's top prosecuting body, said Li introduced Zhou to his current wife.

Li attended a party committee meeting within the ministry on December 16, which is believed to have been his last public appearance.

Zhang Lifan , a Beijing-based political analyst, said that Li's downfall signalled that the investigation was closing in on Zhou. He predicted that an announcement over Zhou's investigation could come sometime around Christmas.

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This article is now closed to comments

patricia.donalds
DoD study on random polygraphs for personnel. ****t.co/Tr7uafTd
"the polygraph is the single most effective tool for finding information people were trying to hide." - DIA, NSA.
CBP could require current employees to undergo polygraphs. ****t.co/MpPsmq2p
Make policy that polygraphs for all new hires expire every 2-5yrs. ****shar.es/epfm2
California laws strengthened wall of silence among officers. ****shar.es/lITUZ
Random drug, lie detector tests for Police Officers in Spain. ****www.trinidadexpress.com/news/Random-drug-lie-detector-tests-221734651.html
Dodgers' big gift moves LAPD closer to on-body video cameras. ****www.latimes.com/local/la-me-dodgers-lapd-20131002,0,4237783.story
The honest, brave officers with integrity deserve better.
And so does the public.
Wherever you are in the World, in your own jurisdictions, in your own capacity, you can do something, anything, just one thing. And make a difference.
Break the code. Break the culture.
chl3388@netvigator.com
All the official officers disregard junior or senior in China are involved in corruption activities!
ngsw
A good sign is that at early Deng’s era, officials openly boasted their corruptions, a previlege for those with power, but now they have to do it stealthily, or wisely such as morphing corruptions to perks. Lets wait and see what Xi can achieve. Zhu Rong Ji had failed in his 100 coffins promise.
jeffrey.forsythe.52
The entire blood-thirsty Chinese Communist Party runs on corruption, exactly like the Mafia. Once in a while one of the brutal leaders makes a power grab and is eliminated. Westerners are kept in the dark concerning the atrocities that have been and are still being committed by the vicious CCP, because of corporate greed. Right now the heinous CCP is trying to eliminate by the use of torture, slavery, organ harvesting and murder, the tens of millions of innocent Falun Gong who live in Red China. This fact is never mentioned by Western media because of that insatiable greed.
chaz_hen
Correction: money-thirsty...not blood-thirsty. And it's more akin to just another new imperial Chinese dynasty rather than the Mafia
norodnik
Call in Kim Jong Un - he apparently can get to the bottom of these types of things in a matter of days...
Sifu_628
Chinese adage: "Beat the dog to punish its master". Li and others were henchmen for their benefactor, Zhou, who himself benefited from close alliance with retired political leaders including Li Peng and Bo Zi Bo. This is how China works, ruthless alliances to further economic and political gains of self-serving clicks. Today belongs to President Xi's, but no one can predict China's power structure in the future. It will not be ruled by laws or principles of individual liberty, social equity, universal justice or compassionate citizenship but continue on a path of feudalistic back-dealings to further the interests of the political elites, their families and crony-associates. So what has changed?
Camel
And how it is different somewhere else?
scmpbeijing1
Not long now!
 
 
 
 
 

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