• Mon
  • Jul 28, 2014
  • Updated: 7:25pm
NewsChina
PROTESTS

16 Chinese victims of Vietnam riots suffered concussion and fractures

PUBLISHED : Monday, 19 May, 2014, 12:53pm
UPDATED : Monday, 19 May, 2014, 4:49pm

Chinese nationals suffered concussion and multiple bone fractures after they were badly wounded in Vietnam’s anti-China riots, Xinhua reported.

Sixteen victims were airlifted from Vietnam to hospital in Chengdu yesterday morning aboard a chartered medical flight arranged by Beijing.

They were among the first batch of some 290 Chinese workers who were evacuated from Vietnam yesterday by three flights arranged by the Chinese government.

“I only feel safe when coming back home,” Cao Wenjun, one of the injured workers, was quoted as saying.

The Chinese Transport Ministry also sent five ships to Vietnam yesterday to evacuate another 4,000 nationals.

According to Xinhua, the recent anti-China violence in Ha Tinh has left two Chinese citizens dead and more than 100 others injured. The riots followed a large protest by workers on Tuesday against China’s recent placement of an oil rig in disputed waters around the Paracel Islands in the South China Sea.

China had already dispatched five vessels to Vietnam to complete the evacuation of 3,000 nationals from Vietnam over the weekend.

Most travel agencies on the mainland have suspended their Vietnam tour services.

Ctrip.com, a major online travel service provider, confirmed to Xinhua yesterday that it has suggested clients planning to travel to Vietnam suspend their trips.

Those who have booked Vietnam journeys with the company will be refunded, the firm said.

“Vietnam is not safe for travelling. We have cancelled ten tour groups to Vietnam since Friday,” said a spokesman for Shenzhen China International Travel Service Company.

Meanwhile, major Chinese telecom equipment manufacturers ZTE and Huawei have no plans to evacuate Chinese employees from Vietnam, according to the Shenzhen Special Zone Daily.

The report said both companies have issued higher alerts for their Vietnam operations but found their businesses were running normally.

 

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