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  • Dec 20, 2014
  • Updated: 5:40am
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DIPLOMACY

China ready to end India border row, says Foreign Minister Wang Yi

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 11 June, 2014, 3:43am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 11 June, 2014, 9:18am
 

China was ready for a final settlement of its border disputes with India and prepared to invest more in the South Asian nation if trade rules were eased, Foreign Minister Wang Yi said in New Delhi.

"Through years of negotiation, we have come to an agreement on the basics of a boundary agreement, and we are prepared to reach a final settlement," he said near the end of a two-day visit that included a meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Wang did not elaborate.

He arrived in India as an envoy of President Xi Jinping , who has accepted Modi's invitation to visit later this year.

Modi, elected prime minister last month, had accepted an invitation from Premier Li Keqiang for an early visit to Beijing, his office said.

India and China are seeking to prevent territorial disagreements from affecting economic ties.

"The Chinese are prepared to renew their ties with the Indians in a much more positive way," said Hoo Tiang Boon, of the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore. "They understand that foreign relations in East Asia aren't exactly ideal. The last thing they want is their western flank to create problems for them as well."

China is India's largest trading partner.

Wang said Chinese firms would be prepared to invest in Indian infrastructure, including high-speed trains and manufacturing, with more attractive regulations, and the two sides agreed to relax visa rules.

"China-India cooperation is like a massive buried treasure waiting to be discovered," Wang said. "The potential is massive."

Beijing may be motivated to resolve tensions as relations with Japan and Southeast Asian nations have deteriorated over other territorial disputes.

India accuses China of occupying 38,000 sq km of territory in Jammu and Kashmir, while Beijing lays claim to 90,000 sq km of land in Arunachal Pradesh state.

 

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This article is now closed to comments

whymak
Asia Pulse:
You are inviting insults with your nonstop nonsense. Japan's average GDP growth for the last 11 years is a poor 0.8%, not 6.7%. Its national debt stands at 230% of its national output. China is not only India's largest trading partner, but also Japan and South Korea.
So it appears that you are both history and economics illiterate. Maybe you should pawn off your China bashing to other English illiterates.
Asia Pulse
I think the Indian government has still fresh in its memory the Sino-Indian war of 1967 and all the continuous conflicts and incursion of Chinese army into Indian territory.
China is more and more isolated and reach out to India in an odd and desperate move. Hopefully the Indian government will not fall for this thick trick. India has so much more to gain from Japan who is enjoying now a 6.7% annualized GDP growth rate, the U.S. and the rest of Asia than from a declining China.
A Kuro
India started a war against China which it lost very badly to the extent the road to new Delhi was wide open. Aren't you just too happy to rub that in on the Indians just to provoke them and to cause problems for Sino-Indian relations? By now, the Chinese have forgotten the 1962 war and have moved on.
req
Export more deodorants to India. That'll make them less offensive.
whymak
Asia Pulse:
Please don't show off your stupidity and ignorance in history. Indo-China military conflict occurred in 1962 (not 1967) along Aksai Chin and Ladakh on the so called McMahon Line drawn unilaterally by the British as the demarcation between colonial India subcontinent and China. India as a nation did not exist then. It was then composed of hundreds of states vanquished by the British Empire. Though the line was never recognized by China, there was some semblance of a line of control by both countries during the 50s.
Through the early 60s, India kept moving their administrative posts into what China considered encroachment on its territory. India did not let up after repeated warnings from China. War fever was rife in Lok Sabha and its delusional military leaders.
After war broke out, China won decisive victories with its army poised to take over tens of thousand square miles from India's Assam Plain. Instead, China voluntarily withdrew to its former line of control, restored captured weapons, war materiel and repatriated them with 2,100 prisoners of war, including a brigadier general.
Indeed, it is the most magnanimous act by a victor seldom seen in Western history. Now go ahead and make my day with your hate China diatribe about its motives.
jiawang@adb.org
It will be a very strategic move if China solves the border dispute with India.
India will be taken out of the "encircle China" equation.
xeroid47@yahoo.com
It's really up to India. China essentially offered to abandon claims on Arunachal Pradesh in exchange for India abandoning claims on the west. 90,000 square kilometers for 38,000 square kilometers
req
shut up you retarded chimp.
whymak
How About:
Below is one of my 3 posts to your link:

Attached here is an email to a friend for comments below:
It was sometime in early 1963 when I visited you in Poughkeepsie and had a long conversation over Bertrand Russell and the India-China border war.
Back then both Kennedy and Khrushchev supported India against China. CIA lent substantial support both to India and to Tibetans in exile there, where they conducted subversive activities in Tibet. Confident in the support by two superpowers and a perceived military superiority over China, Nehru was oblivious to the two nuclear behemoths’ confrontation over Cuba. It was perhaps a stroke of good luck, or more likely, Mao and Zhou Enlai read correctly that this would be a limited mano-a-mano combat between India and China.
Instead of being chastened by its poor war efforts and starting some soul searching, India’s democratic politicians had nothing but wounded pride and hubris. They dogged Nehru to stage another rematch. I remember Nehru’s frustration in responding to some members of Lok Sabha: “Do you expect me to march into Peking with oxcarts?”
Well, at least these deluded folks in the world’s largest democracy showed love for country. That you won’t find in many Hong Kongers today.
Even today I feel badly about this brief war between these two countries. However reluctantly, we had humiliated a country of 1.2 billion people.
whymak
How About:
Below is one of my 3 posts to your link:

Attached here is an email to a friend for comments below:
It was sometime in early 1963 when I visited you in Poughkeepsie and had a long conversation over Bertrand Russell and the India-China border war.
Back then both Kennedy and Khrushchev supported India against China. CIA lent substantial support both to India and to Tibetans in exile there, where they conducted subversive activities in Tibet. Confident in the support by two superpowers and a perceived military superiority over China, Nehru was oblivious to the two nuclear behemoths’ confrontation over Cuba. It was perhaps a stroke of good luck, or more likely, Mao and Zhou Enlai read correctly that this would be a limited mano-a-mano combat between India and China.
Instead of being chastened by its poor war efforts and starting some soul searching, India’s democratic politicians had nothing but wounded pride and hubris. They dogged Nehru to stage another rematch. I remember Nehru’s frustration in responding to some members of Lok Sabha: “Do you expect me to march into Peking with oxcarts?”
Well, at least these deluded folks in the world’s largest democracy showed love for country. That you won’t find in many Hong Kongers today.
Even today I feel badly about this brief war between these two countries. However reluctantly, we had humiliated a country of 1.2 billion people.

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