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EDUCATION

Porn site urges users to fight against national education in Hong Kong

Erotic website urges users to campaign against national education

PUBLISHED : Sunday, 02 September, 2012, 12:00am
UPDATED : Sunday, 02 September, 2012, 3:04am
 

Online porn surfers aren't easily stunned, but those visiting one popular adult site got a big shock yesterday when all they found was a message telling them to "put your trousers back on" and stand up and be counted in the campaign against national education.

The ThisAV website, which markets itself as "the world leader of Chinese porn" replaced its usual erotic content with a picture of three fully-clothed 18-year-olds sitting on banners during a protest outside the government headquarters at Tamar, Admiralty.

"Sorry, ThisAV is closed today," the message read. "Put your trousers back on and think why these kids have to do the things you are supposed to do.

"Try and understand what these kids are doing for you and your children outside the government headquarters at Tamar today, and their ideals and goals," it continued.

Marketed as a pornographic equivalent of video-sharing site YouTube, the website usually offers Chinese and Japanese porn, with an interface entirely in Chinese. It is unclear who runs the website.

The group Scholarism staged a carnival-style protest outside the government headquarters in support of three of its members on a hunger strike against the subject's introduction in primary schools when the new term starts tomorrow. They argue that the subject will be used as a brainwashing tool.

"We love the country, love the party and love Hong Kong; that's why we respect the 'one country, two systems' principle and our right to autonomy under the Basic Law, and hope that the government could implement them," the website read.

"Therefore we hope the government will listen to what 90,000 marchers [in July] and these Scholarism kids express. They are already fighting for the scrapping of the controversial national education subject in a most peaceful and rational way."

It urged users to follow a link to Scholarism's page on social network Facebook.

"I can't represent the entire group, but if you ask me, of course I'm happy if we get support from different sectors of society," said Oscar Lai Man-lok, 18, a member of Scholarism.

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