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CRIME

'Charge me or free me' challenge by Anonymous Asia computer hacker

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 13 October, 2012, 12:00am
UPDATED : Saturday, 13 October, 2012, 3:17am
 

A member of hacker group Anonymous Asia arrested in connection with attacks on several government websites will reject any extension of his bail when he reports back to police on Monday, the group said.

The man, 22, who calls himself "T", was arrested twice, in May and August, for mobilising people via Facebook to attack websites of departments including the police and Department of Justice. He was bailed to report back to police on Monday.

"T" is expected to use a tactic known as kicking the bail, increasingly popular among arrested activists, that forces police to charge a person within 48 hours or let them go.

The group urged people who took part in its hacking campaign - whether or not they have been arrested - to show up on Monday to support the member. "Police still arrested him even though T was just calling for attacks," a spokesman for the group said.

"It is political suppression. Would it also be a breach of law to call on people to take part in the annual July 1 rally?"

Barrister Albert Luk Wai-hung said that, judging from previous cases, "T" would probably receive a prison sentence if convicted, even if his effort to mobilise attacks was unsuccessful.

"It is similar to home burglary - it is like asking people to enter someone's premises and the loss could be large," he said.

Police said they had arrested five men aged between 15 and 31 in July and August relating to the attack case.

A police spokesman said anyone who initiated attacks on websites was liable to a maximum of five years in jail.

"The internet is not a virtual world without a law to govern it," he said.

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