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  • Aug 30, 2014
  • Updated: 10:13pm
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POLICE

Hong Kong police chief tells city to watch its mouth

Andy Tsang appeals to Hongkongers over foul language in wake of disputes with force

PUBLISHED : Monday, 16 September, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Monday, 16 September, 2013, 5:54pm

Greet others' mothers no more - such was the latest message from the police chief in his appeal against Hongkongers using foul language in public.

"Greeting mothers" is a common Cantonese expression referring to foul language.

"Both the police and ordinary residents should be respectful - respect oneself, respect others, and respect the society of Hong Kong," said police commissioner Andy Tsang Wai-hung.

"Let's imagine a Hong Kong where you greet my mother and I greet yours on the street - what kind of society will it be?

"You cannot do something simply because it's not illegal," Tsang said.

His said this yesterday, about two months after schoolteacher Alpais Lam Wai-sze was recorded swearing at police officers and the video went viral on the internet. Lam swore in English.

She was dissatisfied with the force's "inaction" towards anti-Falun Gong protesters obstructing the religious group's activity on a Mong Kok street.

The online dispute with Lam led to a pro-police rally last month, during which thousands of supporters and detractors of the teacher exchanged insults in Mong Kok.

Commenting on the issue in an interview on Commercial Radio, Tsang called it "natural" for the police force to be unhappy when it was "misunderstood".

He asked the police to remain calm in all situations.

But he rejected allegations that police had a political agenda in arresting protesters, claiming that protesters' methods had turned increasingly radical, if not violent.

Tsang also said he would liaise with the Department of Justice on the updated prosecution policy that regulates the arrest of protesters to see if the police needed to change its practices.

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jaan
"Both the police and ordinary residents should be respectful - respect oneself, respect others, and respect the society of Hong Kong," said police commissioner Andy Tsang Wai-hung.
How about respecting the Basic Law Mr. Tsang?
"Article 27
Hong Kong residents shall have freedom of speech, of the press and of publication; freedom of association, of assembly, of procession and of demonstration..."
tfung
sorry, being respectful and having the freedom of speech can surely co-exist.. You can speak freely about what you are thinking and print whatever you want, but you can still be respectful and not need to use vulgar language...
Using foul language only shows the low level of education and upbringing of a person... You can express the same thoughts without having to resort to it...
fink
A commitment to freedom of speech means a commitment to defending all types of speech, vulgar or otherwise.
.
Who decides what is "respectful" language anyway? The police?
mercedes2233
How people can defend a popular use of foul language is beyond me. This may be within freedom of speech, but certain not preferable. Civility and respect for others make living together in a society easier than using profanities at each other.
ejmciii
Come on, Cantonese provides a broad palate for colorful and perhaps off-color language.
mercedes2233
Freedom of speech should not be used to abuse other people unnecessarily, particularly not people who are unable to respond in the same way, like the police on that occasion. That attitude is not constructive and only shows the low standard of the speaker. The teacher was abusing the police non-stop when she should have attended the police station as requested and made her queries and comments there. Courtesy and etiquette helps the society to live together more or less harmoniously. This is what puts 'civil' in 'civilization', instead of using our machetes and bows and arrows on each other.
ianson
So now we have it. Commissioner Tsang thinks he has the right to go beyond the law and be the leader of our moral police. Hong Kong's going down the Communist Party drain faster than you can say DLLM.
hlcheng@me.com
Tsang and his cohort should watch their mouths first before anyone else. The Hong Kong Police is notorious of their foul language, on and off duty, no matter. It is tantamount to accusing someone being nefarious while he himself is a pimp!

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