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  • Sep 20, 2014
  • Updated: 8:57am

Leung Chun-ying

Leung Chun-ying, also known as CY Leung, is the chief executive of Hong Kong. He was born in 1954 and assumed office on July 1, 2012. During the controversial 2012 chief executive election, underdog Leung unexpectedly beat Henry Tang, the early favourite to win, after Tang was discredited in a scandal over an illegal structure at his home.

NewsHong Kong
POLITICS

Xi Jinping urges Hongkongers to show pragmatism on political reform

President calls for consensus on 2017 election, backs work of Leung Chun-ying and his team; CY says he's confident of progress on reform

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 18 December, 2013, 6:06pm
UPDATED : Thursday, 19 December, 2013, 7:25am
 

Poll

  • Yes: 45%
  • No: 55%
19 Dec 2013
  • Yes
  • No
Total number of votes recorded: 328

President Xi Jinping yesterday urged Hongkongers to show pragmatism and foster consensus on arrangements to elect their chief executive by universal suffrage in 2017.

On the penultimate day of Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying's visit to Beijing, Xi told Leung that he and his administration had been "seeking change while maintaining stability, and putting the people first".

"The central government affirms your and the SAR government's work," he said.

Xi was accompanied by National People's Congress chairman Zhang Dejiang , Vice-president and Politburo member Li Yuanchao , and Wang Guangya , head of the State Council's Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office. The president devoted the second half of his opening remarks to political reform. He said debate must stay within the legal framework.

"The central government's stance is consistent and clear," Xi said. "I hope all Hongkongers will start a pragmatic discussion based on the stipulations of the Basic Law and the decision made by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress to forge consensus."

The standing committee ruled in 2007 there could be universal suffrage for the 2017 poll.

Xi added that the Communist Party's third plenum had intensified the nation's economic reform and would foster co-operation between the mainland and Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

In response, Leung told Xi he was confident of progress on political reform.

Leung and commerce chief Greg So Kam-leung later called on Commerce Minister Gao Hucheng to discuss fluctuating food prices. Leung said the minister had promised to send a deputy to Hong Kong to supervise efforts to stabilise prices and ensure safety ahead of January's Lunar New Year holiday. So, housing chief Professor Anthony Cheung Bing-leung and financial services minister Professor Chan Ka-keung are accompanying Leung to meet ministers.

A government source dismissed suggestions the three had been invited because Beijing wished to bypass Leung by sending orders directly to ministers. The source said the idea for the ministers to join him was suggested by Leung as a way for them to build ties in Beijing.

In Hong Kong, Beijing loyalist lawmaker Tam Yiu-chung welcomed Xi's call for pragmatism.

"If we only raise proposals based on our own opinions, I am afraid that it will be difficult to achieve universal suffrage," said Tam, chairman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong.

But Alan Leong Kah-kit, leader of the pan-democratic Civic Party, said Xi's remarks showed that Beijing had "yet to understand what Hong Kong people want". Leong said: "Hong Kong's governance problems originate from a chief executive who lacks a mandate."

Today Leung and Chan will visit the finance ministry; they and Cheung will meet Wang, then Leung and Cheung will meet the National Development and Reform Commission.

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15

This article is now closed to comments

johnyuan
Hong Kong needs to reform in order to catch up with China’s continuous transformation if not even of the nations or cities it has had half-heartily modeled.
.
For one good reason to reform, let more people become billionaires which is a dream that is not unattainable. Hong Kong is already ranking second of having the most number of billionaires after New York City. Think how differently Hong Kong is from New York City that the latter is so much more egalitarian or civilize. Why can’t Hong Kong be like that since there may be more billionaires as a result? I can tell you New Yorkers are both practical and pragmatic folks that successfully putting good business acumen in good use for an egalitarian society. Making people to eat expansive bread and butter is not the way.
.
Xi Jinping’s advice for Hong Kong to practice pragmatism is right on the money. If Hong Kong doesn’t reform, it will become irreverent even to Beijing.
Hollander323
I would echo an agreeable comment by another reader in below....................................................
" I am always surprised how negative most respondents are whenever leaders in China say something about Hong Kong. It seems that we are losing the sense to have capability to have a reasonable and rational discussion about critical issues. To be very honest, I think CY has been doing a very good job starting from day 1, he has been doing what he told us during election : housing, 雙非,內交 etc. and focusing on what is good for HK and China. Main problem is that we have so many parties want him and HK to prove their points. Let's listen and be patient and political reform is one but not the only one thing which is critical."
johnh
@shouken
Which cave did you come from? Beijing would love nothing more than to "simply appoint a governor", in fact that's what they've been doing since 1997. And it has led to Hong Kong people's anger toward the government and our eternal demand for freedom. If you think Beijing deserves what the Brits had, you should resurrect the students from Tiananmen square who got run over by tanks, and ask how they feel about Communist leadership. Seriously, stay in your hole.
shouken
Why should HK need a directly elected Chief Executive? Beijing should simply appoint a governor, like the British government did prior to 1997. Why should Beijing settle for less than what the Brits enjoyed?
----
By giving HK so much ground it is proving itself unworthy of sovereignty over HK and self-defeatingly lending some parochial-minded locals an exaggerated sense of self-importance.
bpoon1pc
I am always surprised how negative most respondents are whenever leaders in China say something about Hong Kong. It seems that we are losing the sense to have capability to have a reasonable and rational discussion about critical issues. To be very honest, I think CY has been doing a very good job starting from day 1, he has been doing what he told us during election : housing, 雙非,內交 etc. and focusing on what is good for HK and China. Main problem is that we have so many parties want him and HK to prove their points. Let's listen and be patient and political reform is one but not the only one thing which is critical.
wramirez
Pragmatism on reform me no reform; not now or forever.
gamzarlee
this time,the government really knows how to do the right thing to stop the public
lexishk
Translation: "Shut up and obey."
ejmciii
Well, the master has spoken. Now you have your answer as to what the masters will allow for we poor peasants, like there really was any doubt what they were going to say and do. It was baked a long time ago. They cannot have free thinking people running the government here for the people of HK. They need slaves, not free people, to keep the engine running. Hail to the new Emperor.
chuchu59
HK people are pragmatic and are willing to compromise. What irks many of us is the framework installed in the consultation paper issued last week. Beijing also needs to be pragmatic but they have despatched a lousy messenger in CY to deliver Beijing's message to us. For starters, the consultation process should have been started within 6 months after CY assumed office so that people from all walks of life could voice opinions. Carrie should also not have indicated we cannot say anything that is wide off the mark. We can propose anything we think fit. At the end of the day, once the opinions are collated they can scrutinise them and declare which of these dont conform with the BL. Batting opinions down at the early stage is hardly consultation. Beijing may have a bottom line. Perfectly understandable especially since they have multiple concerns. However, they should start to really listen to HK people instead of merely relying on the wind blown to their ears by the LO or the CE.

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