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  • Dec 25, 2014
  • Updated: 8:13am
Occupy Central
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POLITICS

Hong Kong police can handle Occupy Central, says Justice Secretary

PUBLISHED : Monday, 09 June, 2014, 3:03am
UPDATED : Monday, 09 June, 2014, 9:40am
 

Hong Kong police alone can handle any incident that could potentially damage the city's law and order, Secretary for Justice Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung said yesterday.

Yuen's remarks came one day after the former director of Xinhua's Hong Kong branch, Zhou Nan, said "anti-China forces" were using the Occupy Central movement to try to seize control of Hong Kong's administration and that the PLA would step in if riots were to occur in the city.

"If necessary, I believe the police force is capable of handling any activities that would damage the law and order," Yuen said, reiterating a long-standing government position, while declining to make any specific comment on Zhou's remarks.

"From a legal standpoint, civil disobedience must involve a breach of law; it has always been the government's stance that we do not wish to see any unlawful act being taken," Yuen said when asked if Occupy Central would constitute "subversion of the state".

He advised those who were considering taking part to think again before joining Occupy Central, a civil disobedience movement that has vowed to bring the city's commercial hub to a standstill if the government fails to come up with a satisfactory plan to implement universal suffrage for the 2017 chief executive election.

Civil disobedience would have a "significant impact" on Hong Kong, Yuen said.

Dr Benny Tai Yiu-ting, a co-founder of Occupy Central and a legal scholar at the University of Hong Kong, said the organisers had always stuck to their plans despite repeated attacks from Beijing.

"This latest attack on us by Mr Zhou Nan is just one of the many [that we have witnessed] over the past 10 months or so … though this is perhaps one of the most powerful cannons fired so far, and we expect to see more suppression," Tai said yesterday at a forum on electoral reform.

At the same event, Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun called for Hongkongers to cast their vote in Occupy Central's unofficial "referendum" on June 20-22.

An advert in the Catholic paper Kung Kao Po said that starting from Saturday, Zen would embark on a seven-day campaign to march in most of the city's 18 districts in order to call for Hongkongers to vote in the "referendum". Zen is expected to walk for about 12 hours and cover 20km a day.

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ejmciii
Of course the HK Police can handle this and are the proper authorities. This movement is not armed revolutionaries, for goodness sake. They are students and teachers and business people and housewives from all sectors of HK that do not want Beijing telling us how to live. These are people who want to work within the system but the CE and his team do not want to listen to the people. The only people the CE listens to are the Masters in Beijing. This is not a violent group, but they do want to be heard. Beijing again is fear-mongering to have an excuse to quell peaceful demonstrations and crush dissent so it can control the debate. The Taiwanese and all other nations should be watching closely. This is what a promise means to the Communist Chinese-we will take what we want when we want to, despite any promises. HK people stay vigilant. Your liberties have been slowly eroded since 1997 and Beijing has no intention of loosening the leash or allowing us greater freedom and liberty. Keep your eyes open because once those liberties are gone, it is very unlikely the Masters in Beijing will be giving us new liberties. Your only freedom will be to elect who they tell you to elect, say what you are told to say and do what you are told to do, just like it is in the mainland. One nation to them trumps two systems no matter what they agreed.
dienw
Come on mh! 1967 is 47 years ago now and, ironically, the radical rioters were followers of the Communist Party, partly inspired by the Cultural Revolution.
We have several better and more recent examples of whether the protests will be violent - see 1989 after the Tiananmen "incident", 2003 in relation to Article 23, last week remembering the Tiananmen "incident" - just 3 examples of how non-violent, frustrated and angry Hong Kongers are. The Police handled all of these protests in a calm and sensible way ensuring that they did not boil over into violence.
In fact, I would go so far as to say that *if* the PLA did become involved, the chances of violence and rioting and consequential "instability" of which everyone is so scared will increase exponentially.
mh0908
The first potential flaw in your argument is that with the experience of 1967, no one can be certain the radicals of today will not carry out the same type of violent acts. History tends to repeat itself. And whether we like it or not, we have a Basic Law and a fifty year liberty until 2047. We don't know if we the people can ask for an extension beyond 2047 but I believe we can try, but through peaceful means. Being extreme and radical will not help. I am sure you won't talk to your parents that way neither. By breaking law and order, you are diminishing the people's chance to achieve political results though logical and peaceful negotiations. So I call on the politicans today to float the idea of asking the Central Government to grant Hong Kong a high degree of self government on a 50+50+50+50 years term.
kctony
What the **** are you talking about,mh?
The 1967 riots were instigated by the so call HK Communists. Upon confirmation that they were not supported by Beijinedg, the HK police cleaned them up. That riot crashed the HK property market and look who emerged as property tycoons since.
Occupy Central will be peaceful. The participants are ready to be arrested when the police come along. It's up to the police then before some strange uneducated pro-government faction start stirring things up.
What chance of universal suffrage do HK have? And you trust the Basic Law? Haven't you seen enough that the Basic Law is always subject to INTERPRETATION, certainly not in favour of the people of Hong Kong whom our government sworn in to serve?
whymak
There are far too many children being used by politicos to boost headcount in demonstrations. There ought to be a law against it.
Have you seen insults and fisticuffs exchanged between demonstrators and counter demonstrators? So far our police has behaved admirably when confronted by verbal insults. In any Western country, the foul-mouthed teacher would have served time for disorderly conduct and abuse of officers.
Only fools believe crowd stampedes and tempers could always be contained when hateful dark passions similarly expressed by readers here run amok. Don't forget the safety of those children in these demonstrations. Even a good-willed Lan Kwai Fong crowd could easily kill 20. You can only blame this on mob behavior.
Murphy Law says the worst would eventually happen when given a chance. When blood flowed in the streets, Benny Tai and his ilk would wash their hands behind the ivory tower and point their fingers at the Beijing government.
HK government is so stifled by fear of the mob. Constabulary actions are seldom taken against physical assaults, misdemeanors and disorderly conduct. In any Western country, hurling innocuous objects -- shoes, bananas, etc. -- at speakers is considered physical assault, but not in HK.
How could you guarantee that absolutely no one -- and there are plenty of provocateurs -- wouldn't snap or turn suddenly violent in a demonstration?
Just remember that during 6/4, blazing guns were the only proper response to killing soldiers.
whymak
Mr. Yuen's words are not to be trusted. The HKSAR government is so stifled by fear that constabulary actions are seldom taken against physical assaults, misdemeanors and disorderly conduct. In any Western country, hurling innocuous objects -- shoes, bananas, etc. -- at speakers is considered physical assault, but not in HK.
Money laundering is a criminal offense, so say our statutory books. Yet given available documentation and admissions by all parties, the millions given by publisher Lai Chee Ying to Cardinal Zen and Anson Chan remain uninvestigated by ICAC.
A "man-of-the-cloth" accepted millions under the table for "good causes." What if not subversion? Shouldn't this at least raise the eyebrows of our law enforcement officials?
There are far too many children being used by politicos to boost headcount in demonstrations. There ought to be a law against it.
Have you seen insults and fisticuffs exchanged between demonstrators and counter demonstrators? So far our police has behaved admirably when confronted by verbal insults. In any Western country, the foul-mouthed teacher would have served time for disorderly conduct and personal abuse.
Only fools believe crowd stampedes and tempers could always be contained. Don't forget the safety of those children at Victoria Park and the rowdy Lan Kwai Fong tragedy that killed 2 dozens.
Whatever our officials might tell us, rest assured that the PLA would be there to back up our highly ceremonial police force.
req
That teacher was so repulsive she should've been shot, well before you could hear it.

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