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  • Sep 20, 2014
  • Updated: 6:21am
Occupy Central
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POLITICS

Give us 'one man, one vote' even if there's no public nomination in 2017: poll

Survey shows majority of Hongkongers will sacrifice public nomination for chance to exercise their right to vote in 2017

PUBLISHED : Monday, 16 June, 2014, 4:53am
UPDATED : Monday, 16 June, 2014, 10:07am

More than half the city wants the "one man, one vote" system introduced for the 2017 chief executive election even if it follows a candidate-nomination process that they are unhappy with, a survey has found.

It also found more than half of some 1,000 respondents believe it is not against the Basic Law to allow the public to nominate candidates. Public nomination has been vetoed by Beijing as against the city's mini-constitution, leading to concerns pro-democracy candidates will be screened out by a nominating committee.

The survey, conducted by Lingnan University, was commissioned by the 15-strong Concern Group for Public Opinion on Constitutional Development. The group includes three Democratic Party members; Andy Ho On-tat, a former information coordinator for ex-chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen; and Centaline Property Agency boss Shih Wing-ching.

At a press conference yesterday, Ho emphasised that the group was committed to a nonpartisan approach on reform.

"We don't belong to any political camp and we don't know how our findings will affect others' choices," Ho said. "We don't have a collective opinion on any proposal in particular, or on Occupy Central … we just wanted to deepen discussion in the society through our survey."

One of the Democrats - former lawmaker Fred Li Wah-ming - also stressed that his party had nothing to do with the concern group. He added that a report on the survey would be sent to all 70 lawmakers and the Hong Kong government.

Based on the poll, the people want to encourage lawmakers to be flexible and open to negotiation, said Dr Cheung Kwok-wah, another member of the concern group and dean of education and languages at the Open University. "Hongkongers treasure their right to choose," he added.

The finding that 52 per cent of Hongkongers do not believe public nomination is illegal will not make pleasant reading for Beijing loyalists.

Nor will the finding that 54 per cent of Hongkongers want "one man, one vote" regardless of the nominating process please pan-democratic lawmakers. They have threatened to veto a government reform proposal that fails to give voters a genuine choice.

However, only 35 per cent of respondents said they would rather keep the status quo if the proposal was unsatisfactory.

Cheung noted that about 36 per cent of the respondents identified themselves as pan-democratic, while about a fifth said they were pro-establishment.

About a quarter believed the local government should get the blame if the reform process fails; 18 per cent pointed to Beijing and 15 per cent the pan-democrats.

Last night, Labour Party chairman Lee Cheuk-yan said he did not think pan-democrats should vote in favour of an "unsatisfactory" proposal. "But as a political party, we need to have our ideals while listening to the public."

Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun led marchers from Lam Tin through Wong Tai Sin to Lok Fu yesterday on day two of his seven-day campaign to rally voters to take part in Occupy Central's "referendum", which starts on Friday.

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chuchu59
'One man one vote was never a problem but if the nominating committee chucks out what they deem as unwanted elements I cant see how it is different from the past 3 CE elections. Yes, maybe we could have Peter Woo or YT Liang instead of CH TUNG and Alan Leong instead of Donald TSANG. Maybe we might even have Albert HO or Henry TANG instead of CY. Honestly, though, do those that have lost appeal to the public. Maybe, but certainly not for me. Voting means nothing without a proper choice and that's what we are told we shall be getting. Well, Beijing needs to wise up and groom someone to be the next CE if they are so wary of unpatriotic elements. Right now, their choices are abysmal at best.
blue
You did include some pan-democrats there like Albert HO and Alan Leong. That would already be a huge step forward in the right direction since they're democrats at least.

Aside from people like Albert Ho, Alan Leong, Ronny Tong, and maybe even Dr. Chan Ka Lok; I can't really think of anyone on the pan-democratic side who isn't a complete joke right now.

I really think the pan-dems need to work harder to be "presidential", for a lack of a better word.
KwunTongBypass
Hong Kong "democracy" will follow the proven model of our grocery stores: You can freely select between ParknShop, Fusion, Great, Taste, and Supadepa.....Questions anybody?
hard times !
faked democracy/universal suffrage is worse than no democracy at all ! As the chosen chief executive by a universal suffrage ( one man, one vote but the candidates are screened as they are nominated by the pro-Beijing elements in town) which is not democratic at all ! Such a chief executive will boldly claim to represent all of us ! How absurd it is !
ianson
First, we get "city wants the 'one man, one vote' system ... even if it follows a candidate-nomination process that they are unhappy with",
then it's
"Hongkongers want 'one man, one vote' regardless of the nominating process".
What question was asked? If it was in line with the latter, the extension to the former is not legitimate but, rather, spin to please the CCP. To ask a question saying "regardless of" alone does not mean all who answer "Yes" accept an undemocratic NC process because the "one man, one vote" phrase would be taken by many as a statement of true democracy.
kongshan2047
"The finding that 52 per cent of Hongkongers do not believe public nomination is illegal will not make pleasant reading for Beijing loyalists. Nor will the finding that 54 per cent of Hongkongers want "one man, one vote" regardless of the nominating process please pan-democratic lawmakers. They have threatened to veto a government reform proposal that fails to give voters a genuine choice..." I think what this is suggesting is that, politics is the art of compromise and there is no such thing as an "one size fits all" approach here. Politicians sometimes do need to shallow their pride and just abandon their political ideologies if we are to move forward.
DinGao
At any rate, an improvement on one man with two or even three votes as we have now.
ssslmcs01
False or predetermined democracy is not democracy. It would be better to keep the current method of electing the Chief Executive than to give the false impression that we have democracy under a mechanism in which the nominating committee screens out certain candidates.
 
 
 
 
 

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