Outlawing the 'L-word'? What about the rest? | South China Morning Post
  • Fri
  • Mar 6, 2015
  • Updated: 9:03am
Public Eye
PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 16 July, 2014, 3:46am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 16 July, 2014, 3:46am

Outlawing the 'L-word'? What about the rest?

BIO

Michael Chugani is a Hong Kong-born American citizen who has worked for many years as a journalist in Hong Kong, the USA and London. Aside from being a South China Morning Post columnist he also hosts ATV’s Newsline show, a radio show and writes for two Chinese-language publications. He has published a number of books on politics which contain English and Chinese versions.
 

Outlawing the 'L-word'? What about the rest?

What makes the Equal Opportunities Commission jump? Not racial taunts against so-called ethnic minorities. What makes anti-discrimination boss Dr York Chow Yat-ngok jump is when a few dozen wackos parade in Tsim Sha Tsui calling mainlanders "locusts". Why else do you think he has talked far more about hostility towards mainlanders than the daily discrimination ethnic minorities have long endured? In seeking public views on, among other things, how to protect mainlanders, the commission is even considering making it an offence to use the word "locust" as a racial taunt. Please forgive us for using these other racial taunts, but what about "molocha" for Indians, "huk kwai" for blacks, and gweilo? If "locust" becomes a legal no-no, then surely the others should be, too. Chow says that even if the L-word becomes outlawed, the threshold to prove racism will be very high. Public Eye is all for fighting racism, but outlawing a word?

 

Occupy with love or hate, but Beijing won't buckle

Is Occupy Central really going to doom us? Opponents insist the civil disobedience protest will hit Hong Kong like a tsunami, first paralysing the business district, then causing a domino effect that will clog cross-harbour tunnels, bring chaos to the MTR system and finally shut down the whole city. Organisers dismiss that as scaremongering. They envisage Occupy to be a lovefest, with peace and love as the core message. Sounds very much like the Woodstock music festival. Why not call it "Centralstock" instead of Occupy Central? That sounds far less confrontational. Live bands, protesters flashing peace signs and people making love in the open - John Lennon would have been proud. Just don't do drugs. But if the organisers intend Occupy to be a lovefest instead of a fist in the face, how will that make Beijing buckle to its democracy calls? Whoever heard of anyone kowtowing when threatened with love and peace? Surely, the only way to make someone double over is a knee in the groin. Was that not the original aim - to wring democracy out of Beijing with the threat to shut down Hong Kong's commercial life? If that has been replaced with love and peace, we suggest they call the whole thing off. In any case, the organisers are dreamers to think love and peace or even a knee in the groin will make Beijing buckle.

 

Let landfill opponents drown in their own waste

Here is some advice for Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing: give them the finger and go on vacation. Let the rubbish pile high. And when people find the stink unbearable, name and shame those who caused it. This is called fighting fire with fire. Wong warned the city would soon drown in refuse unless obstructionist legislators approved funds for landfill extensions and an incinerator. Let it drown, the deeper the better. That is the only way to fight back against self-serving legislators who put their own interests above the interests of society. Every city in the world has landfills and most of them have incinerators too. How else would they dispose of their rubbish? But here in Hong Kong, obstructionist legislators let "not-in-my-backyard" lobbies hold the entire city to ransom in exchange for votes. The waste facilities will have to be built sooner or later. There are no alternatives. But the longer the obstructionists play politics, the higher the price tag will become. And it will be ordinary taxpayers who pay. So when the rubbish starts piling high outside your home, remember who is to blame.

 

Michael Chugani is a columnist and television show host. mickchug@gmail.com

 

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