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  • Dec 19, 2014
  • Updated: 7:38pm

Bradley Manning

Bradley Manning is a US soldier who was arrested in May 2010 in Iraq on suspicion of having passed classified military material to the whistleblowing website WikiLeaks. Assigned to an army unit based near Baghdad, Manning had access to databases used by the military to transmit classified information. He was charged with 22 offences by the US government, including those of communicating national defence information to an unauthorised source and aiding the enemy. A military judge on July 30 2013 acquitted Manning of the most serious charge against him, aiding the enemy, but convicted him of most of the other charges including espionage, theft and computer fraud.

NewsWorld
UNITED STATES

Witness says no one killed as a result of Bradley Manning's leaks

PUBLISHED : Friday, 02 August, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 02 August, 2013, 3:33am
 

A former US Army intelligence expert who investigated the fallout from the handover of classified files to WikiLeaks by Bradley Manning said no one named in the Afghan war logs had been killed.

The testimony on Wednesday, by retired brigadier general Robert Carr, put a dent in the government's case at the start of the sentencing hearing for Manning, the American soldier convicted of espionage for giving hundreds of thousands of documents to the anti-secrecy website headed by Julian Assange.

On Tuesday, Manning, 25, was acquitted of the most serious charge of "aiding the enemy"- a setback for military prosecutors. But the army private - responsible for the biggest intelligence leak in US history - was found guilty of espionage, computer fraud and other charges, meaning he could still be jailed for up to 136 years.

Pledging to illustrate the impact of Manning's "criminal conduct" on US forces, lead prosecutor Major Ashden Fein called Carr to the stand.

Carr, who led the Defence Intelligence Agency's Information Review Task Force put in place after the Manning leaks, told the court martial at Fort Meade outside Washington that the disclosures were damaging.

When asked if he believed the information provided to WikiLeaks could be used by US adversaries, Carr replied: "Absolutely. I was very concerned."

But when pressed by the defence, Carr admitted no one listed in the Afghanistan war logs reviewed by his task force had been killed.

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