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  • Jul 10, 2014
  • Updated: 9:57pm
NewsWorld
DRUGS

Meth smuggling charges in US court show North Korea's role in drug trade

Case before US federal court links members of Hong Kong syndicate to international conspiracy

PUBLISHED : Thursday, 21 November, 2013, 10:35pm
UPDATED : Friday, 22 November, 2013, 4:38pm
 

Five men, including two members of a Hong Kong-based criminal organisation, have been charged with conspiracy to import 100kg of nearly pure North Korean-produced methamphetamine into the United States.

Federal officials said the case illustrates the emergence of North Korea as a player in the global drug trade.

The men were part of a sprawling international drug trafficking ring led by a former American soldier, Joseph Manuel Hunter, who has separately been charged with conspiring to murder a Drug Enforcement Administration agent and with importing cocaine into the US, federal officials said.

These traffickers have no respect for borders and no regard for law
DEA ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE LEONHART

"These guys worked for and with Joseph Hunter in a transnational criminal organisation that involved drugs, weapons, chemicals, murder and a close involvement with rogue nations," said a senior federal law enforcement official, who was not authorised to discuss the case publicly.

The five men - from Britain, Taiwan and the Philippines - were arrested in Phuket, Thailand, in September and extradited to the US on Tuesday . They appeared Wednesday in federal court in New York.

In January, the group agreed to provide 100kg of meth to a man they thought was a drugs trafficker but who was a confidential source working with the DEA.

One of the defendants, Ye Tiong Tan Lim, 53, from Taiwan, bragged that his Hong Kong-based criminal group was the only organisation that was able to produce meth in North Korea because of a crackdown there on the drug trade, according to a criminal indictment filed in federal court.

The other member of the Hong Kong syndicate was Philippines national Kelly Allan Reyes Peralta.

Lim told the DEA source that the North Korean government "already burned all the labs. Only our labs are not closed … To show Americans that they are not selling it any more, they burned it," Lim said.

The meth was first sent to the Philippines, and the men agreed to deliver the narcotics in Thailand, where they were told it would be shipped to the US by boat.

One of the defendants said that his organisation had stockpiled one ton of North Korean methamphetamine in the Philippines because "we already anticipated this thing would happen … [whereby] we cannot bring out our goods right now".

The group arranged for a "dry run" and sent a shipping container of tea leaves from the Philippines to Thailand to test the delivery channel that would later be used to ship the meth.

The drugs were later seized in Thailand and in the Philippines. The North Korean meth tested at more than 99 per cent pure, DEA officials said.

"Like many international criminal networks, these drug traffickers have no respect for borders and no regard for either the rule of law or who they harm as a result of their criminal endeavours," DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart said.

The five men could face a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years and the possibility of life in prison.

"Methamphetamine is a dangerous, potentially deadly drug, whatever its origin," said Preet Bharara, US attorney for the Southern District of New York.

"If it ends up in our neighbourhoods, the threat it poses to public health is grave whether it is produced in New York, the US, or in North Korea."

Hunter, 48, the alleged leader of the ring, was arrested in September in Thailand and sent to the United States.

Nicknamed "Rambo", Hunter had served as a sergeant in the US Army. When he left the service in 2004, he began a new life as a contract killer, according to senior law enforcement officials. In May, Hunter and two other former US soldiers allegedly planned to kill a DEA agent and one of the agency's informants for US$800,000.

"My guys will handle it," Hunter allegedly e-mailed an undercover informant on May 30 when asked if he could execute the killings.

Four others have been arrested in the case, including another former US Army sergeant, and German and Polish nationals.

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