• Mon
  • Dec 22, 2014
  • Updated: 2:22pm
NewsWorld
SOUTH SUDAN

UN: 120,000 people displaced by South Sudan violence

United Nations says more than 120,000 displaced by violence in South Sudan as regional leaders meet in Nairobi

PUBLISHED : Friday, 27 December, 2013, 8:13pm
UPDATED : Friday, 27 December, 2013, 9:29pm
 

More than 120,000 people have been displaced by continuing violence in South Sudan, the United Nations said, as African leaders met on Friday to find a political solution to a crisis that has exposed ethnic rifts within the country.

Regional leaders under a bloc called IGAD are meeting on Friday in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi to discuss South Sudan. That summit is expected to produce a roadmap for peace talks between South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and former Vice President Riek Machar, Kiir’s political rival who is accused of orchestrating a failed coup that the government says sparked unrest across the oil-producing East African country.

“We in Kenya and the region are concerned with the loss of lives and resultant humanitarian crisis and would like to see the government taking the initiative to end hostilities,” Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta said late on Thursday.

The number of internally displaced people has been rising since fighting started on December 15 in the capital, Juba, before spreading across the country. Now there are sporadic military clashes in the oil-rich states of Unity and Upper Nile, potentially endangering the oil revenues that South Sudan depends on to keep the government running.

The UN said aid agencies need at least US$166 million to save lives.

Machar, the alleged leader of renegade forces now in control of some parts of South Sudan, remains a fugitive wanted by the military. At least 10 of his political allies are in detention for their roles in the alleged coup plot. Machar denies there was a coup attempt, and some officials with the ruling party insist violence broke out when presidential guards from Kiir’s majority Dinka tribe tried to disarm guards from the Nuer ethnic group, leading to wider military clashes along ethnic lines.

The top UN humanitarian official in South Sudan, Toby Lanzer, said earlier this week that he believes the death toll has surpassed 1,000. The UN also is investigating alleged mass killings in the latest violence.

“We have heard reports of extra-judicial killings, arbitrary detentions of civilians, ill-treatment, abuse and also mass graves,” said Hilde Johnson, head of the UN mission in South Sudan. “Our human rights officers have been working around the clock, throughout this crisis, and they are investigating these reports and allegations.”

Following a meeting on Thursday with the leaders of Ethiopia and Kenya, Kiir agreed “in principle” to stop hostilities and to negotiate with Machar, who is expected to be formally invited by IGAD to attend upcoming peace talks, according to South Sudanese Foreign Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has repeatedly urged South Sudan’s leaders to start talks, but it remains unclear when Kiir and Machar will start negotiations.

Machar, an influential politician who appears to command the loyalty of Nuer army officers, has criticised Kiir as a dictator and says he will contest the 2015 presidential election. Kiir had fired Machar as his deputy in July following a power struggle within the ruling party, stoking ethnic tensions in a country with a history of divided military loyalties.

Share

For unlimited access to:

SCMP.com SCMP Tablet Edition SCMP Mobile Edition 10-year news archive
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Login

SCMP.com Account

or