• Sat
  • Dec 27, 2014
  • Updated: 1:53am
NewsWorld
ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeologists find a cemetery for dogs, Aztecs' guide to afterlife

PUBLISHED : Sunday, 16 February, 2014, 5:26am
UPDATED : Sunday, 16 February, 2014, 5:26am

Archaeologists announced the discovery of "an exceptional" old burial site under an apartment building in Mexico City containing the remains of 12 dogs, animals that had a major religious and symbolic significance to the Aztec peoples of central Mexico.

Previously, the remains of dogs have been found accompanying human remains or as part of offerings, experts with Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History said. But this is the first time a group of dogs has been found buried together at one site.

"This is definitely a special finding because of the number of dogs and because we have found no connection to a building or with the deceased," said archaeologist Rocio Sanchez Morales.

Aztecs believed dogs could guide human souls into a new life after death on earth, and could guard pyramids and other monuments when buried under them.

The dogs were buried at around the same time in a small pit between AD1350 and AD1520, the heyday of the Aztec empire.

The team of archaeologists determined when the dogs were buried through ceramics and other items found in nearby pits under the apartment building in the populous Mexico City borough of Aztacapozalco, Sanchez Morales said.

Michael Smith, an anthropology professor at Arizona State University in the US who was not involved in the project, said the discovery was important because it was the first such find.

"This is not the first time a burial of a dog has been found, but it is the first find where many dogs were carefully buried together, in a setting that is like a cemetery," Smith said.

Sanchez Morales said they would need to dig deeper to see if there were other items that could help them find out why the animals were buried in that area.

Smith said it would be important to see the results of the analysis of the bones.

"That work will tell us about the breed of these dogs, and it may tell us how they were killed," he said.

Share

For unlimited access to:

SCMP.com SCMP Tablet Edition SCMP Mobile Edition 10-year news archive
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Login

SCMP.com Account

or