CYBER SECURITY

Jennifer Lawrence says theft of nude photos from iCloud was a sex crime

Oscar winner speaks publicly for first time about nudes hacked from Apple iCloud

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 08 October, 2014, 11:20pm
UPDATED : Thursday, 09 October, 2014, 3:15am

Oscar-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence has spoken publicly for the first time after naked pictures of her were hacked and posted online, angrily slamming the leak as a "sex crime".

Speaking to Vanity Fair, the rising siren of the silver screen said she felt violated and was afraid of how the hacked photographs would affect her career.

"Just because I'm a public figure, just because I'm an actress, does not mean that I asked for this," she told the November issue of the magazine, available online yesterday.

"It's my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting. I can't believe that we even live in that kind of world."

Hackers dumped nude photos of more than a dozen Hollywood celebrities on social media last month after snatching them from Apple's iCloud in what the tech giant called a "targeted attack".

"It is not a scandal. It is a sex crime," the 24-year-old actress told Vanity Fair.

"It is a sexual violation. It's disgusting. The law needs to be changed, and we need to change. That's why these websites are responsible.

"Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated, and the first thought that crosses somebody's mind is to make a profit from it. It's so beyond me. I just can't imagine being that detached from humanity. I can't imagine being that thoughtless and careless and so empty inside."

She told Vanity Fair she had sent the photographs to her then boyfriend while they were in a long-distance relationship.

"It was long distance, and either your boyfriend is going to look at porn or he's going to look at you."

More than a dozen Hollywood celebrities have threatened to sue Google for failing to crack down on the leaks.

A letter by prominent lawyer Marty Singer published by the Hollywood Reporter warned they could seek US$100 million in damages from the online search giant for failing to take down the photos.