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Hurricane Harvey

‘Life-threatening and devastating flooding expected’: Hurricane Harvey makes landfall in Texas as Category 4 storm

President Trump, facing the first large-scale natural disaster of his presidency, said on Twitter he signed a disaster proclamation which “unleashes the full force of government help”

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 26 August, 2017, 11:24am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 30 August, 2017, 12:32pm

Hurricane Harvey slammed into the Texas coast on Friday as a Category 4 storm with winds of up to 130 miles per hour, the most powerful storm in over a decade to hit the mainland US.

The hurricane made landfall between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor around 10pm and is expected to dump over 90cm of rain along the Texas coast and parts of Louisiana as it lingers for days.

While thousands fled the expected devastating flooding and destruction, many residents defied mandatory evacuation orders and stocked up on food, fuel and sandbags.

“We’re suggesting if people are going to stay here, mark their arm with a Sharpie pen with their name and Social Security number,” Rockport Mayor Pro Tem Patrick Rios told reporters on Friday, according to media reports. “We hate to talk about things like that. It’s not something we like to do but it’s the reality. People don’t listen.”

As many as 5.8 million people were believed to be in the storm’s path, as well as the heart of America’s oil refining operations. The storm’s impact on refineries has already pushed up petrol prices.

We’re suggesting if people are going to stay here, mark their arm with a Sharpie pen with their name and Social Security number
Rockport Mayor Patrick Rios

As a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, Harvey could uproot trees, destroy homes and disrupt utilities for days. It is the first major hurricane to hit the mainland United States since Hurricane Wilma struck Florida in 2005.

Donald Trump, facing the first large-scale natural disaster of his presidency, said on Twitter he signed a disaster proclamation which “unleashes the full force of government help” shortly before Harvey made landfall.

In Corpus Christi, a city of 320,000 under voluntary evacuation, strengthening winds buffeted the few trucks and cars that continued to circulate on the streets. The storm toppled wooden roadwork signs and littered the streets with pieces of palm trees as white caps rocked sailing boats in their docks.

About 137km north in Victoria, Mayor Paul Polasek told CNN he estimated that 60 per cent to 65 per cent of the town’s 65,000 residents defied the mandatory evacuation order.

Jose Rengel, a 47-year-old who works in construction, said he was one of the few people in Jamaica Beach in Galveston that did not heed a voluntary evacuation order.

“All the shops are empty,” he said as the sky turned black and rain fell. “It’s like a tornado went in and swept everything up.”

With the hurricane bearing down on the Texas coast, at least three cruise ships operated by Carnival Corp with thousands of passengers aboard were forced to change their plans to sail for the Port of Galveston.

Two of them headed New Orleans to pick up fresh supplies, while the third delayed its departure from Cozumel, Mexico.

The National Hurricane Centre’s (NHC) latest tracking model shows the storm sitting southwest of Houston for more than a day, giving the nation’s fourth most populous city a double dose of rain and wind.

“Life-threatening and devastating flooding expected near the coast due to heavy rainfall and storm surge,” the NHC said.

Louisiana and Texas declared states of disaster, authorising the use of state resources to prepare.

The city of Houston warned residents of flooding from close to 60cm of rain over several days.

Life-threatening and devastating flooding expected near the coast due to heavy rainfall and storm surge
National Hurricane Centre

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner advised city residents not to leave en masse, saying “no evacuation orders have been issued for the city”. Chaotic traffic from a rushed evacuation in 2005 with Hurricane Rita proved tragic. “Calm and care!” he said in a tweet.

Service stations on the south Texas coast were running out of fuel as thousands of residents fled the region. US petrol prices spiked as the storm shut down 22 per cent of Gulf of Mexico oil production, according to the US government.

At a Willis, Texas, station, about 77km north of Houston, Corey Martinez, 40, was heading to Dallas from his Corpus Christi home.

“It has been pretty stressful. We’re just trying to get ahead of the storm,” he said. “We’ve never been through a hurricane before.”

More than 45 per cent of the country’s refining capacity is along the US Gulf coast, and nearly a fifth of the nation’s crude oil is produced offshore. Ports from Corpus Christi to Texas City, Texas, were closed to incoming vessels and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Anadarko Petroleum Corp, ExxonMobil Corp and others have evacuated staff from offshore oil and gas platforms.

Concern that Harvey could cause shortages in fuel supply drove benchmark petrol prices to their highest in four months, before profit taking pulled back prices. Meanwhile, US petrol margins hit their strongest levels in five years for this time of year.

The US government said it would make emergency stockpiles of crude available if needed to plug disruptions. It has regularly used them to dampen the impact of previous storms on energy supplies.