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Donald Trump

Sean Spicer, White House press secretary who became late-night laughing stock, promises new book will ‘set the record straight’

Melissa McCarthy impersonated him almost weekly on Saturday Night Live, portraying him as a crazed angry man shouting nonsense at reporters

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 12 December, 2017, 10:26pm
UPDATED : Tuesday, 12 December, 2017, 10:26pm

Former White House press secretary Sean Spicer is releasing a book in the summer about what his publisher described as his “turbulent tenure” with the Trump administration.

The book, titled The Briefing, will be released on July 23, 2018, through Regnery Publishing, which bills itself as “the country’s leading publisher of conservative books.”

The book’s tagline promises it will shed “new light on the headline-grabbing controversies of the Trump administration’s first year”.

Spicer served as the White House press secretary for the Trump administration until July, when he resigned. During that time, he shared a contentious relationship with the press.

Spicer appeared on Fox News’s Hannity on Monday night, where he blasted the press for what he called a “mass amount of incorrect and malicious attacks on the president.”

The book, he told Sean Hannity, will “set the record straight”.

“I looked back at the coverage of the campaign, the transition and the first six, seven months of this White House, and realised the stories that are being told are not an accurate represent (sic) of what President Trump went through to get the nomination, to transition to the White House and then his first six months in office,” Spicer told Sean Hannity. “I’ve decided it’s incumbent upon me to set the record straight.”

[The press holds] everybody else to one standard and themselves to quite another
Sean Spicer

Spicer became known – and often mocked – for his news briefings, which became a favourite target of Saturday Night Live. Melissa McCarthy impersonated him almost weekly on the show, portraying him as a crazed angry man shouting nonsense at reporters.

The tone was set at the very outset of his tenure with his arguments with reporters about the size of the crowd at Trump’s inauguration, which he falsely claimed was “the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period.”

On Hannity, Spicer said the press holds “everybody else to one standard and themselves to quite another”. He added that if one story has a correction, then “you can’t pick and choose … which stories to believe and which stories not to.”

Spicer was replaced by current White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on July 21.

“The president wanted to bring on some folks, to add to the team. This is something you dream of. I can’t thank the president enough,” Spicer told The Washington Post at the time of his resignation, adding that he had no regrets.

“I’m grateful for Sean’s work on behalf my administration and the American people,” Trump said in a statement about Spicer’s resignation. “I wish him success as he moves on to pursue new opportunities – just look at his great television ratings.”