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  • Oct 2, 2014
  • Updated: 7:41pm

Lance Armstrong

Seven-time Tour de France winner. Armstrong was a professional road racing cyclist and survivor of testicular cancer who retired in early 2011. In June 2012, the US Anti-Doping Agency charged him of using illegal performance enhancing drugs based on evident of blood samples and other cyclists’ testimony. Armstrong gave up fighting against the allegation in August. On October 22, Union Cycliste Internationale(UCI) announced it recognizes USADA' findings, banning Armstrong for life and stripping all his seven Tour de France titles.

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CYCLING

Armstrong tipped to tell all to Oprah

PUBLISHED : Sunday, 13 January, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Sunday, 13 January, 2013, 5:03am
 

Lance Armstrong reportedly plans to admit to doping for the first time in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that will be taped tomorrow at the disgraced cyclist's home in Austin, Texas.

USA Today cited "a person with knowledge of the situation" as saying Armstrong plans to admit to doping throughout his career, but that he probably will not go into great detail about specific cases and events.

The announcement that Armstrong had agreed to an interview, to air on Winfrey's OWN cable TV network on Thursday, sparked widespread speculation that he might finally confess to being a drug cheat after years of strenuous denials.

It will be Armstrong's first interview since he was stripped in October of his seven Tour de France titles after the US Anti-Doping Agency said he helped orchestrate the most sophisticated doping programme in sports history.

Armstrong sent a text saying: "I told her [Winfrey] to go wherever she wants and I'll answer the questions directly, honestly, candidly. That's all I can say."

Last week, The New York Times reported that Armstrong, 41, was considering publicly admitting he used banned performance-enhancing drugs in a bid to return to competitive sport in marathons and triathlons.

Not everyone is convinced that such an interview is the proper venue for Armstrong to address the charges against him.

"Only Lance would get to have his moment of truth, if that's what it will be, in front of Oprah Winfrey," said British cyclist David Millar, who served a two-year ban after admitting doping in 2004 and is now a member of the athletes' commission for the World Anti-Doping Agency.

"It is not sitting in front of a judge or a disciplinary hearing being properly questioned about the things he has done wrong."

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jay.north.1848
Here is a preview of the interview at ****sorrysods.com
 
 
 
 
 

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