• Tue
  • Jul 15, 2014
  • Updated: 12:16am
SportOther Sport
MOTOR SPORT

Controversy lingers as F1 heads to violence-wracked Bahrain

Bahrain anti-government groups have stepped up clashes as F1 circus returns to kingdom

PUBLISHED : Friday, 19 April, 2013, 12:00am
UPDATED : Friday, 19 April, 2013, 5:19am
 

Formula One moves to Bahrain this weekend, with the Grand Prix in the tiny, resource-rich Gulf kingdom again taking place against a backdrop of long-running dissent and continued protest.

Groups protesting the race have put up makeshift roadblocks and barricades of burning tyres during clashes with security forces in the violence-wracked nation.

The demonstrations yesterday were mostly isolated, in anti-government areas, however, and unlikely to disrupt preparations for Sunday's race.

The latest clashes were mostly in Shiite districts that are often scenes of unrest. Graffiti on walls said: "No F1. Don't race on our blood."

Bahrain has faced more than two years of violence between the Sunni-led government and majority Shiites seeking a greater political voice.

The race was shelved in 2011 due to pro-democracy protests by the minority Shia Muslim population but resumed last year, despite calls for it to be axed due to claims of human rights abuses and heavy-handed police tactics against protesters.

The run-up to Sunday's race has again witnessed an increase in protests by hardline groups and a crackdown by the Bahrain authorities, prompting fresh calls for F1 to question its annual presence in the country on ethical grounds.

On the track, Germany's Sebastian Vettel of Red Bull leads the drivers' championship on 52 points from Finland's Kimi Raikkonen in the Lotus (49) and Ferrari's Fernando Alonso (43), who won last week's Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai with ease.

Mercedes team chief Ross Brawn, though, believes that the race will show whether they have a car fast enough to challenge Red Bull and Ferrari after Lewis Hamilton secured pole position and then finished a creditable third in China.

"The pleasing thing is we've been to three races this year and we have not been bad. Bahrain will be the final one of the opening quartet that will tell us if we have a car that we can get to work at most places," he said.

"We seem to have but we have to lift the performance another two or three tenths compared to the opposition - and we know it is a moving target."

Brawn said that there were plenty of encouraging signs that Mercedes had a much better car this year. Ferrari's team chief Stefano Domenicali was also confident following Alonso's triumph in Shanghai.

The team's Ferrari F138 car was already more competitive than last year's F2012 at the same time, he added.

"The car seems better this year in terms of pure performance, even though that is not enough because we need to make it better and better," he explained.

"We have another situation in Bahrain with different conditions. We will see where the performance of our car relative to the others will be there."

Three former world champions have won this year's opening three races, while the once-dominant Red Bull team has been troubled by internal strife.

Australian driver Mark Webber struggled in the season's opener in Melbourne - his home race - then was stunned in Malaysia when Vettel ignored team orders and snatched victory from him.

In China, he ran out of fuel in qualifying and then collided with Frenchman Jean-Eric Vergne in the Toro Rosso and lost a wheel.

That clash has brought Webber a grid penalty this weekend but team chief Christian Horner has backed him to make his mark.

"He will be fine. He is a tough competitor and he was driving very well," he added.

Horner also rejected all suggestions that the team was involved in a conspiracy to favour Vettel and undermine Webber.

Share

For unlimited access to:

SCMP.com SCMP Tablet Edition SCMP Mobile Edition 10-year news archive
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Login

SCMP.com Account

or